Molecular epidemiology of nontuberculous mycobacteria isolates from clinical and environmental sources of a metropolitan city

Ali Akbar Velayati, Parissa Farnia, Mohadese Mozafari, Donya Malekshahian, Shima Seif, Snaz Rahideh, Mehdi Mirsaeidi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

28 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Introduction: While NTM infection is mainly acquired from environmental exposure, monitoring of environmental niches for NTM is not a routine practice. This study aimed to find the prevalence of environmental NTM in soil and water in four highly populated suburbs of Tehran, Iran. Material and Methods: A total of 4014 samples from soil and water resources were collected and studied. Sediments of each treated sample were cultured in Lowenstein-Jensen medium and observed twice per week for growth rate, colony morphology, and pigmentation. Colonies were studied with phenotypic tests. Molecular analysis was performed on single colonies derived from subculture of original isolates. Environmental samples were compared with 34 NTM isolates from patients who were residents of the study locations. Results: Out of 4014 samples, mycobacteria were isolated from 862 (21.4%) specimens; 536 (62.1%) belonged to slow growing mycobacteria (SGM) and 326 (37.8%) were rapid growing mycobacteria (RGM). The five most frequent NTM were M. farcinogens (105/862; 12.1%), M. fortuitum (72/862; 8.3%), M. senegalense (58/862; 6.7%), M. kansasii (54/862; 6.2%), and M. simiae (46/862; 5.3%). In total, 62.5% (539/862) of mycobacterial positive samples were isolated from water and only 37.4% (323/862) of them were isolated from soil samples (P

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numbere114428
JournalPLoS One
Volume9
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 8 2014
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Nontuberculous Mycobacteria
molecular epidemiology
Molecular Epidemiology
Mycobacterium
Soil
Soils
Water Resources
Water
Environmental Monitoring
Environmental Exposure
Pigmentation
Iran
Water resources
sampling
Sediments
environmental monitoring
soil resources
Monitoring
water resources
pigmentation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)
  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Molecular epidemiology of nontuberculous mycobacteria isolates from clinical and environmental sources of a metropolitan city. / Velayati, Ali Akbar; Farnia, Parissa; Mozafari, Mohadese; Malekshahian, Donya; Seif, Shima; Rahideh, Snaz; Mirsaeidi, Mehdi.

In: PLoS One, Vol. 9, No. 12, e114428, 08.12.2014.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Velayati, Ali Akbar ; Farnia, Parissa ; Mozafari, Mohadese ; Malekshahian, Donya ; Seif, Shima ; Rahideh, Snaz ; Mirsaeidi, Mehdi. / Molecular epidemiology of nontuberculous mycobacteria isolates from clinical and environmental sources of a metropolitan city. In: PLoS One. 2014 ; Vol. 9, No. 12.
@article{d73200e3995c466d9d7163063a651e0b,
title = "Molecular epidemiology of nontuberculous mycobacteria isolates from clinical and environmental sources of a metropolitan city",
abstract = "Introduction: While NTM infection is mainly acquired from environmental exposure, monitoring of environmental niches for NTM is not a routine practice. This study aimed to find the prevalence of environmental NTM in soil and water in four highly populated suburbs of Tehran, Iran. Material and Methods: A total of 4014 samples from soil and water resources were collected and studied. Sediments of each treated sample were cultured in Lowenstein-Jensen medium and observed twice per week for growth rate, colony morphology, and pigmentation. Colonies were studied with phenotypic tests. Molecular analysis was performed on single colonies derived from subculture of original isolates. Environmental samples were compared with 34 NTM isolates from patients who were residents of the study locations. Results: Out of 4014 samples, mycobacteria were isolated from 862 (21.4{\%}) specimens; 536 (62.1{\%}) belonged to slow growing mycobacteria (SGM) and 326 (37.8{\%}) were rapid growing mycobacteria (RGM). The five most frequent NTM were M. farcinogens (105/862; 12.1{\%}), M. fortuitum (72/862; 8.3{\%}), M. senegalense (58/862; 6.7{\%}), M. kansasii (54/862; 6.2{\%}), and M. simiae (46/862; 5.3{\%}). In total, 62.5{\%} (539/862) of mycobacterial positive samples were isolated from water and only 37.4{\%} (323/862) of them were isolated from soil samples (P",
author = "Velayati, {Ali Akbar} and Parissa Farnia and Mohadese Mozafari and Donya Malekshahian and Shima Seif and Snaz Rahideh and Mehdi Mirsaeidi",
year = "2014",
month = "12",
day = "8",
doi = "10.1371/journal.pone.0114428",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "9",
journal = "PLoS One",
issn = "1932-6203",
publisher = "Public Library of Science",
number = "12",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Molecular epidemiology of nontuberculous mycobacteria isolates from clinical and environmental sources of a metropolitan city

AU - Velayati, Ali Akbar

AU - Farnia, Parissa

AU - Mozafari, Mohadese

AU - Malekshahian, Donya

AU - Seif, Shima

AU - Rahideh, Snaz

AU - Mirsaeidi, Mehdi

PY - 2014/12/8

Y1 - 2014/12/8

N2 - Introduction: While NTM infection is mainly acquired from environmental exposure, monitoring of environmental niches for NTM is not a routine practice. This study aimed to find the prevalence of environmental NTM in soil and water in four highly populated suburbs of Tehran, Iran. Material and Methods: A total of 4014 samples from soil and water resources were collected and studied. Sediments of each treated sample were cultured in Lowenstein-Jensen medium and observed twice per week for growth rate, colony morphology, and pigmentation. Colonies were studied with phenotypic tests. Molecular analysis was performed on single colonies derived from subculture of original isolates. Environmental samples were compared with 34 NTM isolates from patients who were residents of the study locations. Results: Out of 4014 samples, mycobacteria were isolated from 862 (21.4%) specimens; 536 (62.1%) belonged to slow growing mycobacteria (SGM) and 326 (37.8%) were rapid growing mycobacteria (RGM). The five most frequent NTM were M. farcinogens (105/862; 12.1%), M. fortuitum (72/862; 8.3%), M. senegalense (58/862; 6.7%), M. kansasii (54/862; 6.2%), and M. simiae (46/862; 5.3%). In total, 62.5% (539/862) of mycobacterial positive samples were isolated from water and only 37.4% (323/862) of them were isolated from soil samples (P

AB - Introduction: While NTM infection is mainly acquired from environmental exposure, monitoring of environmental niches for NTM is not a routine practice. This study aimed to find the prevalence of environmental NTM in soil and water in four highly populated suburbs of Tehran, Iran. Material and Methods: A total of 4014 samples from soil and water resources were collected and studied. Sediments of each treated sample were cultured in Lowenstein-Jensen medium and observed twice per week for growth rate, colony morphology, and pigmentation. Colonies were studied with phenotypic tests. Molecular analysis was performed on single colonies derived from subculture of original isolates. Environmental samples were compared with 34 NTM isolates from patients who were residents of the study locations. Results: Out of 4014 samples, mycobacteria were isolated from 862 (21.4%) specimens; 536 (62.1%) belonged to slow growing mycobacteria (SGM) and 326 (37.8%) were rapid growing mycobacteria (RGM). The five most frequent NTM were M. farcinogens (105/862; 12.1%), M. fortuitum (72/862; 8.3%), M. senegalense (58/862; 6.7%), M. kansasii (54/862; 6.2%), and M. simiae (46/862; 5.3%). In total, 62.5% (539/862) of mycobacterial positive samples were isolated from water and only 37.4% (323/862) of them were isolated from soil samples (P

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84915750884&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84915750884&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1371/journal.pone.0114428

DO - 10.1371/journal.pone.0114428

M3 - Article

C2 - 25485795

AN - SCOPUS:84915750884

VL - 9

JO - PLoS One

JF - PLoS One

SN - 1932-6203

IS - 12

M1 - e114428

ER -