Modulation of Yersinia type three secretion system by the S1 domain of polynucleotide phosphorylase

Jason A. Rosenzweig, Gabriela Weltman, Gregory V Plano, Kurt Schesser

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50 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Both low temperatures and encounters with host phagocytes are two stresses that have been relatively well studied in many species of bacteria. Previous work has shown that the exoribonuclease polynucleotide phosphorylase (PNPase) is required for Yersiniae to grow at low temperatures. Here, we show that PNPase also enhances the ability of Yersinia pseudotuberculosis and Yersinia pestis to withstand the killing activities of murine macrophages. PNPase is required for the optimal functioning of the Yersinia type three secretion system (TTSS), an organelle that injects effector proteins directly into host cells. Unexpectedly, the effect of PNPase on the TTSS is independent of its ribonuclease activity and instead requires its S1 RNA binding domain. In contrast, catalytically inactive enzyme does not enhance the low temperature growth effect of PNPase. Surprisingly, wild-type-like TTSS functioning was restored to the pnp mutant strain by expressing just the ∼70 amino acid S1 domains from either PNPase, RNase R, RNase II, or RpsA. Our findings suggest that PNPase plays multifaceted roles in enhancing Yersinia survival in response to stressful conditions.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)156-163
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Biological Chemistry
Volume280
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 7 2005

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Polyribonucleotide Nucleotidyltransferase
Yersinia
Modulation
Temperature
Exoribonucleases
Yersinia pseudotuberculosis
Yersinia pestis
Macrophages
Growth temperature
Phagocytes
Ribonucleases
Organelles
Bacteria
RNA
Amino Acids

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry

Cite this

Modulation of Yersinia type three secretion system by the S1 domain of polynucleotide phosphorylase. / Rosenzweig, Jason A.; Weltman, Gabriela; Plano, Gregory V; Schesser, Kurt.

In: Journal of Biological Chemistry, Vol. 280, No. 1, 07.01.2005, p. 156-163.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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