Modifying a Research-Based Problem-Solving Intervention to Improve the Problem-Solving Performance of Fifth and Sixth Graders With and Without Learning Disabilities

Jennifer Krawec, Jia Huang

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

2 Scopus citations

Abstract

The purpose of the present study was to test the efficacy of a modified cognitive strategy instructional intervention originally developed to improve the mathematical problem solving of middle and high school students with learning disabilities (LD). Fifth and sixth grade general education mathematics teachers and their students of varying ability (i.e., average-achieving [AA] students, low-achieving [LA] students, and students with LD) participated in the research study. Several features of the intervention were modified, including (a) explicitness of instruction, (b) emphasis on meta-cognition, (c) focus on problem-solving prerequisites, (d) extended duration of initial intervention, and (e) addition of visual supports. General education math teachers taught all instructional sessions to their inclusive classrooms. Curriculum-based measures (CBMs) of math problem solving were administered five times over the course of the year. A multilevel model (repeated measures nested within students and students nested within schools) was used to analyze student progress on CBMs. Though CBM scores in the intervention group were initially lower than that of the comparison group, intervention students improved significantly more in the first phase, with no differences in the second phase. Implications for instruction are discussed as well as directions for future research.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)468-480
Number of pages13
JournalJournal of Learning Disabilities
Volume50
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2017

Keywords

  • cognitive strategies
  • problem solving/calculation
  • strategy instruction

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health(social science)
  • Education
  • Health Professions(all)

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