Modes, weighted modes, and calibrated modes: Evidence of clustering using modality tests

Daniel J. Henderson, Christopher Parmeter, R. Robert Russell

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

34 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We apply recent results from the statistics literature to test for multimodality of worldwide distributions of several (unweighted and population-weighted) measures of labor productivity. Specifically, we employ Silverman (Bump) and Dip modality tests, calibrated to correct for their incorrect asymptotic levels. We show that test results are sensitive to the test statistic employed and to population weighting. But regardless of the statistical criterion used, multimodality is present throughout, or emerges during, our sample period (1960-2000). We also examine (a) movements of economies between modal clusters and (b) relationships between certain key development factors and multimodality of the productivity distribution.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)607-638
Number of pages32
JournalJournal of Applied Econometrics
Volume23
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1 2008
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

multimodality
evidence
statistics
labor productivity
weighting
productivity
economy
Clustering
Multimodality
Test statistic
Productivity
Factors
Labour productivity
Weighting
Statistics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Sciences (miscellaneous)
  • Economics and Econometrics

Cite this

Modes, weighted modes, and calibrated modes : Evidence of clustering using modality tests. / Henderson, Daniel J.; Parmeter, Christopher; Russell, R. Robert.

In: Journal of Applied Econometrics, Vol. 23, No. 5, 01.08.2008, p. 607-638.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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