Moderate and severe traumatic brain injury in adults

Andrew IR Maas, Nino Stocchetti, Ross Bullock

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

1175 Scopus citations

Abstract

Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a major health and socioeconomic problem that affects all societies. In recent years, patterns of injury have been changing, with more injuries, particularly contusions, occurring in older patients. Blast injuries have been identified as a novel entity with specific characteristics. Traditional approaches to the classification of clinical severity are the subject of debate owing to the widespread policy of early sedation and ventilation in more severely injured patients, and are being supplemented with structural and functional neuroimaging. Basic science research has greatly advanced our knowledge of the mechanisms involved in secondary damage, creating opportunities for medical intervention and targeted therapies; however, translating this research into patient benefit remains a challenge. Clinical management has become much more structured and evidence based since the publication of guidelines covering many aspects of care. In this Review, we summarise new developments and current knowledge and controversies, focusing on moderate and severe TBI in adults. Suggestions are provided for the way forward, with an emphasis on epidemiological monitoring, trauma organisation, and approaches to management.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)728-741
Number of pages14
JournalThe Lancet Neurology
Volume7
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1 2008

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Moderate and severe traumatic brain injury in adults'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this