Modeling metabolic syndrome and its association with cognition

The northern manhattan study

Bonnie Levin, Maria Llabre, Chuanhui Dong, Mitchell S V Elkind, Yaakov Stern, Tatjana Rundek, Ralph L Sacco, Clinton B Wright

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

20 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Metabolic syndrome (MetS) is a clustering of vascular risk factors and is associated with increased risk of cardiovascular disease. Less is known about the relationship between MetS and cognition. We examined component vascular risk factors of MetS as correlates of different cognitive domains. The Northern Manhattan Study (NOMAS) includes 1290 stroke-free participants from a largely Hispanic multi-ethnic urban community. We used structural equation modeling (SEM) to model latent variables of MetS, assessed at baseline and an average of 10 years later, at which time participants also underwent a full cognitive battery. The two four-factor models, of the metabolic syndrome (blood pressure, lipid levels, obesity, and fasting glucose) and of cognition (language, executive function, psychomotor, and memory), were each well supported (CFI=0.97 and CFI=0.95, respectively). When the two models were combined, the correlation between metabolic syndrome and cognition was -.31. Among the metabolic syndrome components, only blood pressure uniquely predicted all four cognitive domains. After adjusting for age, gender, race/ethnicity, education, smoking, alcohol, and risk factor treatment variables, blood pressure remained a significant correlate of all domains except memory. In this stroke-free race/ethnically diverse community-based cohort, MetS was associated with cognitive function suggesting that MetS and its components may be important predictors of cognitive outcomes. After adjusting for sociodemographic and vascular risk factors, blood pressure was the strongest correlate of cognitive performance. Findings suggest MetS, and in particular blood pressure, may represent markers of vascular or neurodegenerative damage in aging populations. (JINS, 2014, 20, 1-10)

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)951-960
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of the International Neuropsychological Society
Volume20
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2014

Fingerprint

Cognition
cognition
stroke
Blood Pressure
community
smoking
damages
ethnicity
Stroke
alcohol
Manhattan
Syndrome
Modeling
Disease
Executive Function
gender
language
Hispanic Americans
performance
Blood Vessels

Keywords

  • Aging
  • Cardiovascular
  • Cognition
  • Dementia
  • Hypertension
  • Metabolic syndrome
  • Vascular markers

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Clinical Psychology
  • Neuroscience(all)
  • Language and Linguistics
  • Linguistics and Language

Cite this

Modeling metabolic syndrome and its association with cognition : The northern manhattan study. / Levin, Bonnie; Llabre, Maria; Dong, Chuanhui; Elkind, Mitchell S V; Stern, Yaakov; Rundek, Tatjana; Sacco, Ralph L; Wright, Clinton B.

In: Journal of the International Neuropsychological Society, Vol. 20, No. 10, 01.01.2014, p. 951-960.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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