Missed Opportunities for HIV Testing Among STD Clinic Patients

Sharleen M. Traynor, Lisa Rosen-Metsch, Daniel J Feaster

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Current HIV testing guidelines recommend that all adolescents and adults aged 13–64 be routinely screened for HIV in healthcare settings. Sexually transmitted disease (STD) clinic patients represent a population at increased risk for HIV, justifying more frequent risk assessment and testing. This analysis describes missed opportunities for HIV testing among a sample of STD clinic patients to identify areas where HIV testing services may be improved. Secondary analysis was conducted using data from Project AWARE, a randomized trial of 5012 adult patients from 9 STD clinics in the United States, enrolled April–December 2010. HIV testing history, healthcare service utilization, and behavioral risks were obtained through audio computer-assisted self-interview. Missed opportunities for HIV testing, defined as having a healthcare visit but no HIV test in the last 12 months, were characterized by location and frequency. Of 2315 (46.2%) participants not tested for HIV in the last 12 months, 1715 (74.1%) had a missed opportunity for HIV testing. These missed opportunities occurred in both traditional (54.9% at family doctor, 20.3% at other medical doctor visits) and non-traditional (28.5% at dental, 19.0% at eye doctor, 13.9% at correctional facility, and 13.3% at psychology visits) testing settings. Of 53 participants positive for HIV at baseline, 16 (30.2%) had a missed testing opportunity. Missed opportunities for HIV testing were common in this population of STD clinic patients. There is a need to increase routinized HIV screening and expand testing services to a broader range of healthcare settings.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1-9
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Community Health
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - May 23 2018

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Keywords

  • Health screening
  • HIV testing
  • HIV/AIDS
  • Missed opportunities
  • Sexually transmitted diseases

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health(social science)
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

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