Minimally invasive esophagectomy and gastric pull-up in children

Deiadra Garrett, Dean Anselmo, Henri Ford, Fombe Ndiforchu, Nam Nguyen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose: Minimally invasive esophagectomy and gastric pull-up is a widely accepted method in adults. However, the experience in the pediatric population is limited. Minimally invasive esophagectomy represents a new alternative technique to the conventional open approach. We wish to report our small case series of minimally invasive esophagectomy and gastric pull-up in pediatric patients. The aim of the study is to evaluate the feasibility, safety, and outcomes of the procedure. Methods: Three patients (2 girls and 1 boy) with average age 46 months (34-57 months) and average weight 12.6 kg (11-15 kg) underwent the procedure. The indications for esophagectomy were esophageal stricture from caustic ingestion (2 patients) and failed repair of esophageal atresia (1 patient). Results: Average operative time was 7 h (0519-0752 hours). There were no intraoperative complications with the average blood loss of 50 cc (5-125 cc). No anastomotic leaks were noted on the initial esophagrams that were obtained on postoperative day five or six. One patient developed a cervical wound infection on postoperative day seven due to a retained piece of Penrose, which required a neck exploration, removal of foreign body and repair of a small leak. One patient developed an anastomotic stricture at the 7-month follow-up. She was successfully treated with two balloon dilatations. One patient developed a delayed esophagogastric anastomotic leak at 3 months. The leak spontaneously closed after surgical drainage. At average of 22-month follow-up (15-36 months), all patients were eating regular food with excellent weight gain. Conclusion: Minimally invasive esophagectomy and gastric pull-up is technically challenging but feasible and safe with acceptable outcomes. However, further study is needed to further validate the approach.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)737-742
Number of pages6
JournalPediatric Surgery International
Volume27
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2011
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Esophagectomy
Stomach
Anastomotic Leak
Eating
Pediatrics
Esophageal Atresia
Surgical Wound Infection
Esophageal Stenosis
Caustics
Intraoperative Complications
Operative Time
Foreign Bodies
Weight Gain
Dilatation
Drainage
Pathologic Constriction
Neck
Safety
Weights and Measures
Food

Keywords

  • Children
  • Gastric pull-up
  • Minimally invasive esophagectomy

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Surgery

Cite this

Minimally invasive esophagectomy and gastric pull-up in children. / Garrett, Deiadra; Anselmo, Dean; Ford, Henri; Ndiforchu, Fombe; Nguyen, Nam.

In: Pediatric Surgery International, Vol. 27, No. 7, 01.07.2011, p. 737-742.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Garrett, Deiadra ; Anselmo, Dean ; Ford, Henri ; Ndiforchu, Fombe ; Nguyen, Nam. / Minimally invasive esophagectomy and gastric pull-up in children. In: Pediatric Surgery International. 2011 ; Vol. 27, No. 7. pp. 737-742.
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