Minimally invasive direct pars repair with cannulated screws and recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein

Case series and review of the literature

George M. Ghobrial, Kenneth M. Crandall, Anthony Lau, Seth K. Williams, Allan D Levi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

OBJECTIVE The objective of this study was to describe the use of a minimally invasive surgical treatment of lumbar spondylolysis in athletes by a fluoroscopically guided direct pars screw placement with recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2 (rhBMP-2) and to report on clinical and radiographic outcomes. METHODS A retrospective review was conducted of all patients treated surgically for lumbar spondylolysis via a minimally invasive direct pars repair with cannulated screws. Demographic information, clinical features of presentation, perioperative and intraoperative radiographic imaging, and postoperative data were collected. A 1-cm midline incision was performed for the placement of bilateral pars screws utilizing biplanar fluoroscopy, followed by placement of a fully threaded 4.0-mm-diameter titanium cannulated screw. A tubular table-mounted retractor was utilized for direct pars fracture visualization and debridement through a separate incision. The now-visualized pars fracture could then be decorticated, with care taken not to damage the titanium screw when using a high-speed drill. Local bone obtained from the curettage was then placed in the defect with 1.05 mg rhBMP-2 divided equally between the bilateral pars defects. RESULTS Nine patients were identified (mean age 17.7 ± 3.42 years, range 14-25 years; 6 male and 3 female). All patients had bilateral pars fractures of L-4 (n = 4) or L-5 (n = 5). The mean duration of preoperative symptoms was 17.22 ± 13.2 months (range 9-48 months). The mean operative duration was 189 ± 29 minutes (range 151-228 minutes). The mean intraoperative blood loss was 17.5 ± 10 ml (range 10-30 ml). Radiographic follow-up was available in all cases; the mean length of time from surgery to the most recent imaging study was 30.8 ± 23.3 months (range 3-59 months). The mean hospital length of stay was 1.13 ± 0.35 days (range 1-2 days). There were no intraoperative complications. CONCLUSIONS Lumbar spondylolysis treatment with a minimally invasive direct pars repair is a safe and technically feasible option that minimizes muscle and soft-tissue dissection, which may particularly benefit adolescent patients with a desire to return to a high level of physical activity.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numberE6
JournalNeurosurgical Focus
Volume43
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1 2017

Fingerprint

Bone Morphogenetic Proteins
Spondylolysis
Titanium
Length of Stay
Curettage
Fluoroscopy
Intraoperative Complications
Debridement
Operative Time
Athletes
Dissection
Demography
Exercise
Bone and Bones
Muscles
Therapeutics
recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2

Keywords

  • Adolescent
  • Athletes
  • Direct pars repair
  • Minimally invasive
  • Spondylolysis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Clinical Neurology

Cite this

Minimally invasive direct pars repair with cannulated screws and recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein : Case series and review of the literature. / Ghobrial, George M.; Crandall, Kenneth M.; Lau, Anthony; Williams, Seth K.; Levi, Allan D.

In: Neurosurgical Focus, Vol. 43, No. 2, E6, 01.08.2017.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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abstract = "OBJECTIVE The objective of this study was to describe the use of a minimally invasive surgical treatment of lumbar spondylolysis in athletes by a fluoroscopically guided direct pars screw placement with recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2 (rhBMP-2) and to report on clinical and radiographic outcomes. METHODS A retrospective review was conducted of all patients treated surgically for lumbar spondylolysis via a minimally invasive direct pars repair with cannulated screws. Demographic information, clinical features of presentation, perioperative and intraoperative radiographic imaging, and postoperative data were collected. A 1-cm midline incision was performed for the placement of bilateral pars screws utilizing biplanar fluoroscopy, followed by placement of a fully threaded 4.0-mm-diameter titanium cannulated screw. A tubular table-mounted retractor was utilized for direct pars fracture visualization and debridement through a separate incision. The now-visualized pars fracture could then be decorticated, with care taken not to damage the titanium screw when using a high-speed drill. Local bone obtained from the curettage was then placed in the defect with 1.05 mg rhBMP-2 divided equally between the bilateral pars defects. RESULTS Nine patients were identified (mean age 17.7 ± 3.42 years, range 14-25 years; 6 male and 3 female). All patients had bilateral pars fractures of L-4 (n = 4) or L-5 (n = 5). The mean duration of preoperative symptoms was 17.22 ± 13.2 months (range 9-48 months). The mean operative duration was 189 ± 29 minutes (range 151-228 minutes). The mean intraoperative blood loss was 17.5 ± 10 ml (range 10-30 ml). Radiographic follow-up was available in all cases; the mean length of time from surgery to the most recent imaging study was 30.8 ± 23.3 months (range 3-59 months). The mean hospital length of stay was 1.13 ± 0.35 days (range 1-2 days). There were no intraoperative complications. CONCLUSIONS Lumbar spondylolysis treatment with a minimally invasive direct pars repair is a safe and technically feasible option that minimizes muscle and soft-tissue dissection, which may particularly benefit adolescent patients with a desire to return to a high level of physical activity.",
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AU - Williams, Seth K.

AU - Levi, Allan D

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N2 - OBJECTIVE The objective of this study was to describe the use of a minimally invasive surgical treatment of lumbar spondylolysis in athletes by a fluoroscopically guided direct pars screw placement with recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2 (rhBMP-2) and to report on clinical and radiographic outcomes. METHODS A retrospective review was conducted of all patients treated surgically for lumbar spondylolysis via a minimally invasive direct pars repair with cannulated screws. Demographic information, clinical features of presentation, perioperative and intraoperative radiographic imaging, and postoperative data were collected. A 1-cm midline incision was performed for the placement of bilateral pars screws utilizing biplanar fluoroscopy, followed by placement of a fully threaded 4.0-mm-diameter titanium cannulated screw. A tubular table-mounted retractor was utilized for direct pars fracture visualization and debridement through a separate incision. The now-visualized pars fracture could then be decorticated, with care taken not to damage the titanium screw when using a high-speed drill. Local bone obtained from the curettage was then placed in the defect with 1.05 mg rhBMP-2 divided equally between the bilateral pars defects. RESULTS Nine patients were identified (mean age 17.7 ± 3.42 years, range 14-25 years; 6 male and 3 female). All patients had bilateral pars fractures of L-4 (n = 4) or L-5 (n = 5). The mean duration of preoperative symptoms was 17.22 ± 13.2 months (range 9-48 months). The mean operative duration was 189 ± 29 minutes (range 151-228 minutes). The mean intraoperative blood loss was 17.5 ± 10 ml (range 10-30 ml). Radiographic follow-up was available in all cases; the mean length of time from surgery to the most recent imaging study was 30.8 ± 23.3 months (range 3-59 months). The mean hospital length of stay was 1.13 ± 0.35 days (range 1-2 days). There were no intraoperative complications. CONCLUSIONS Lumbar spondylolysis treatment with a minimally invasive direct pars repair is a safe and technically feasible option that minimizes muscle and soft-tissue dissection, which may particularly benefit adolescent patients with a desire to return to a high level of physical activity.

AB - OBJECTIVE The objective of this study was to describe the use of a minimally invasive surgical treatment of lumbar spondylolysis in athletes by a fluoroscopically guided direct pars screw placement with recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2 (rhBMP-2) and to report on clinical and radiographic outcomes. METHODS A retrospective review was conducted of all patients treated surgically for lumbar spondylolysis via a minimally invasive direct pars repair with cannulated screws. Demographic information, clinical features of presentation, perioperative and intraoperative radiographic imaging, and postoperative data were collected. A 1-cm midline incision was performed for the placement of bilateral pars screws utilizing biplanar fluoroscopy, followed by placement of a fully threaded 4.0-mm-diameter titanium cannulated screw. A tubular table-mounted retractor was utilized for direct pars fracture visualization and debridement through a separate incision. The now-visualized pars fracture could then be decorticated, with care taken not to damage the titanium screw when using a high-speed drill. Local bone obtained from the curettage was then placed in the defect with 1.05 mg rhBMP-2 divided equally between the bilateral pars defects. RESULTS Nine patients were identified (mean age 17.7 ± 3.42 years, range 14-25 years; 6 male and 3 female). All patients had bilateral pars fractures of L-4 (n = 4) or L-5 (n = 5). The mean duration of preoperative symptoms was 17.22 ± 13.2 months (range 9-48 months). The mean operative duration was 189 ± 29 minutes (range 151-228 minutes). The mean intraoperative blood loss was 17.5 ± 10 ml (range 10-30 ml). Radiographic follow-up was available in all cases; the mean length of time from surgery to the most recent imaging study was 30.8 ± 23.3 months (range 3-59 months). The mean hospital length of stay was 1.13 ± 0.35 days (range 1-2 days). There were no intraoperative complications. CONCLUSIONS Lumbar spondylolysis treatment with a minimally invasive direct pars repair is a safe and technically feasible option that minimizes muscle and soft-tissue dissection, which may particularly benefit adolescent patients with a desire to return to a high level of physical activity.

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