Mindfulness training and reductions in teacher stress and burnout: Results from two randomized, waitlist-control field trials

Robert W. Roeser, Kimberly A. Schonert-Reichl, Amishi Jha, Margaret Cullen, Linda Wallace, Rona Wilensky, Eva Oberle, Kimberly Thomson, Cynthia Taylor, Jessica Harrison

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

168 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The effects of randomization to mindfulness training (MT) or to a waitlist-control condition on psychological and physiological indicators of teachers' occupational stress and burnout were examined in 2 field trials. The sample included 113 elementary and secondary school teachers (89% female) from Canada and the United States. Measures were collected at baseline, post-program, and 3-month follow-up; teachers were randomly assigned to condition after baseline assessment. Results showed that 87% of teachers completed the program and found it beneficial. Teachers randomized to MT showed greater mindfulness, focused attention and working memory capacity, and occupational self-compassion, as well as lower levels of occupational stress and burnout at post-program and follow-up, than did those in the control condition. No statistically significant differences due to MT were found for physiological measures of stress. Mediational analyses showed that group differences in mindfulness and self-compassion at post-program mediated reductions in stress and burnout as well as symptoms of anxiety and depression at follow-up. Implications for teaching and learning are discussed.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)787-804
Number of pages18
JournalJournal of Educational Psychology
Volume105
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1 2013

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Mindfulness
burnout
occupational stress
teacher
elementary school teacher
secondary school teacher
Random Allocation
Short-Term Memory
Canada
anxiety
Teaching
Anxiety
Learning
Depression
Psychology
learning
Group

Keywords

  • Burnout
  • Mindfulness
  • Self-compassion
  • Stress
  • Teachers

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Education

Cite this

Mindfulness training and reductions in teacher stress and burnout : Results from two randomized, waitlist-control field trials. / Roeser, Robert W.; Schonert-Reichl, Kimberly A.; Jha, Amishi; Cullen, Margaret; Wallace, Linda; Wilensky, Rona; Oberle, Eva; Thomson, Kimberly; Taylor, Cynthia; Harrison, Jessica.

In: Journal of Educational Psychology, Vol. 105, No. 3, 01.08.2013, p. 787-804.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Roeser, RW, Schonert-Reichl, KA, Jha, A, Cullen, M, Wallace, L, Wilensky, R, Oberle, E, Thomson, K, Taylor, C & Harrison, J 2013, 'Mindfulness training and reductions in teacher stress and burnout: Results from two randomized, waitlist-control field trials', Journal of Educational Psychology, vol. 105, no. 3, pp. 787-804. https://doi.org/10.1037/a0032093
Roeser, Robert W. ; Schonert-Reichl, Kimberly A. ; Jha, Amishi ; Cullen, Margaret ; Wallace, Linda ; Wilensky, Rona ; Oberle, Eva ; Thomson, Kimberly ; Taylor, Cynthia ; Harrison, Jessica. / Mindfulness training and reductions in teacher stress and burnout : Results from two randomized, waitlist-control field trials. In: Journal of Educational Psychology. 2013 ; Vol. 105, No. 3. pp. 787-804.
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