Migration-selection balance drives genetic differentiation in genesassociatedwithhigh-altitude function in the speckled teal (Anas flavirostris) in the andes

Allie M. Graham, Philip Lavretsky, Violeta Muñoz-Fuentes, Andy J. Green, Robert E. Wilson, Kevin McCracken

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Local adaptation frequently occurs across populations as a result of migration-selection balance between divergent selective pressures and gene flow associated with life in heterogeneous landscapes. Studying the effects of selection and gene flow on the adaptation process can be achieved in systemsthat have recently colonized extremeenvironments. This study utilizes an endemic South American duck species, the speckled teal (Anas flavirostris),which has both high- and low-altitude populations. High-altitude speckled teal (A. f. oxyptera) are locally adapted to the Andean environment and mostly allopatric from low-altitude birds (A. f. flavirostris);however, there is occasional geneflowacross altitudinal gradients. In this study,we used next-generation sequencing to explore genetic patterns associated with high-altitude adaptation in speckled teal populations, as well as the extent to which the balance between selection and migration have affected genetic architecture. We identified a set of loci with allele frequencies strongly correlated with altitude, including those involved in the insulin-like signaling pathway, bone morphogenesis, oxidative phosphorylation, responders to hypoxia-induced DNAdamage, and feedback loops to the hypoxia-inducible factor pathway. These same outlier loci were found to have depressed gene flow estimates, as well as being highly concentrated on the Z-chromosome. Our results suggest a multifactorial response to life at high altitudes through an array of interconnected pathways that are likely under positive selection and whose genetic components seem to be providing an effective genomic barrier to interbreeding, potentially functioning as an avenue for population divergence and speciation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)14-32
Number of pages19
JournalGenome Biology and Evolution
Volume10
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2018

Fingerprint

Anas
genetic differentiation
genetic variation
Gene Flow
gene flow
hypoxia
Population
Z chromosome
loci
oxidative phosphorylation
Ducks
local adaptation
Oxidative Phosphorylation
morphogenesis
outlier
Morphogenesis
Gene Frequency
ducks
Birds
gene frequency

Keywords

  • Hypoxia
  • Local adaptation
  • Waterfowl

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics
  • Genetics

Cite this

Migration-selection balance drives genetic differentiation in genesassociatedwithhigh-altitude function in the speckled teal (Anas flavirostris) in the andes. / Graham, Allie M.; Lavretsky, Philip; Muñoz-Fuentes, Violeta; Green, Andy J.; Wilson, Robert E.; McCracken, Kevin.

In: Genome Biology and Evolution, Vol. 10, No. 1, 01.01.2018, p. 14-32.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Graham, Allie M. ; Lavretsky, Philip ; Muñoz-Fuentes, Violeta ; Green, Andy J. ; Wilson, Robert E. ; McCracken, Kevin. / Migration-selection balance drives genetic differentiation in genesassociatedwithhigh-altitude function in the speckled teal (Anas flavirostris) in the andes. In: Genome Biology and Evolution. 2018 ; Vol. 10, No. 1. pp. 14-32.
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