Microzooplankton, vertical mixing and advection in a larval fish patch

Lewis S. Incze, Peter B. Ortner, James D. Schumacher

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

27 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

A large (̃30 × 75 km) patch of larval walleye pollock, Theragra chalcogramma, was located south of the Alaska Peninsula during May 1986. A drifter deployed in this patch followed an anticyclonic path consistent with dynamic topography. Changes in community composition and vertical distribution of microzooplankton >40 μm were sampled for 4 days alongside this drifter to examine feeding conditions for larvae. Biological and physical changes during the first 2 calm days revealed substantial small-scale variability within the larger circulation pattern. Changes during the last 2 days were dominated by vertical mixing due to strong winds. Despite mixing, prey concentrations remained adequate for feeding by larval pollock as determined by laboratory studies. A satellite-tracked drifter replaced the first drifter and was still located within the patch 6 days later. Overall distributions of larvae and movements of the drifters show a net translation of 7.8 km day-1 south-westward, but details of the study reveal complex interactions between coastal waters and a coastal current. During the 10-day period there was an increase in standard length of the larval fish population of 0.13 mm day-1 and a decline in abundance of ̃7.6% day-1. Both calculated rates must be underestimates due to continuing recruitment of small larvae from hatching eggs.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)365-379
Number of pages15
JournalJournal of Plankton Research
Volume12
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 1990

Fingerprint

drifter
Advection
vertical mixing
Fish
Patch
advection
Theragra chalcogramma
Vertical
larvae
fish
fish roe
Topography
pollock
larva
water currents
Satellites
Prey
coastal water
topography
hatching

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Statistics, Probability and Uncertainty
  • Applied Mathematics
  • Ecology
  • Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics
  • Aquatic Science

Cite this

Microzooplankton, vertical mixing and advection in a larval fish patch. / Incze, Lewis S.; Ortner, Peter B.; Schumacher, James D.

In: Journal of Plankton Research, Vol. 12, No. 2, 01.12.1990, p. 365-379.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Incze, Lewis S. ; Ortner, Peter B. ; Schumacher, James D. / Microzooplankton, vertical mixing and advection in a larval fish patch. In: Journal of Plankton Research. 1990 ; Vol. 12, No. 2. pp. 365-379.
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