Microtubule stabilization reduces scarring and causes axon regeneration after spinal cord injury

Farida Hellal, Andres Hurtado, Jörg Ruschel, Kevin C. Flynn, Claudia J. Laskowski, Martina Umlauf, Lukas C. Kapitein, Dinara Strikis, Vance Lemmon, John Bixby, Casper C. Hoogenraad, Frank Bradke

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

318 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Hypertrophic scarring and poor intrinsic axon growth capacity constitute major obstacles for spinal cord repair. These processes are tightly regulated by microtubule dynamics. Here, moderate microtubule stabilization decreased scar formation after spinal cord injury in rodents through various cellular mechanisms, including dampening of transforming growth factor-β signaling. It prevented accumulation of chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans and rendered the lesion site permissive for axon regeneration of growth-competent sensory neurons. Microtubule stabilization also promoted growth of central nervous system axons of the Raphe-spinal tract and led to functional improvement. Thus, microtubule stabilization reduces fibrotic scarring and enhances the capacity of axons to grow.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)928-931
Number of pages4
JournalScience
Volume331
Issue number6019
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 18 2011

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Spinal Cord Injuries
Microtubules
Cicatrix
Axons
Regeneration
Growth
Spinal Cord Regeneration
Chondroitin Sulfate Proteoglycans
Transforming Growth Factors
Sensory Receptor Cells
Rodentia
Central Nervous System

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • General

Cite this

Hellal, F., Hurtado, A., Ruschel, J., Flynn, K. C., Laskowski, C. J., Umlauf, M., ... Bradke, F. (2011). Microtubule stabilization reduces scarring and causes axon regeneration after spinal cord injury. Science, 331(6019), 928-931. https://doi.org/10.1126/science.1201148

Microtubule stabilization reduces scarring and causes axon regeneration after spinal cord injury. / Hellal, Farida; Hurtado, Andres; Ruschel, Jörg; Flynn, Kevin C.; Laskowski, Claudia J.; Umlauf, Martina; Kapitein, Lukas C.; Strikis, Dinara; Lemmon, Vance; Bixby, John; Hoogenraad, Casper C.; Bradke, Frank.

In: Science, Vol. 331, No. 6019, 18.02.2011, p. 928-931.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Hellal, F, Hurtado, A, Ruschel, J, Flynn, KC, Laskowski, CJ, Umlauf, M, Kapitein, LC, Strikis, D, Lemmon, V, Bixby, J, Hoogenraad, CC & Bradke, F 2011, 'Microtubule stabilization reduces scarring and causes axon regeneration after spinal cord injury', Science, vol. 331, no. 6019, pp. 928-931. https://doi.org/10.1126/science.1201148
Hellal F, Hurtado A, Ruschel J, Flynn KC, Laskowski CJ, Umlauf M et al. Microtubule stabilization reduces scarring and causes axon regeneration after spinal cord injury. Science. 2011 Feb 18;331(6019):928-931. https://doi.org/10.1126/science.1201148
Hellal, Farida ; Hurtado, Andres ; Ruschel, Jörg ; Flynn, Kevin C. ; Laskowski, Claudia J. ; Umlauf, Martina ; Kapitein, Lukas C. ; Strikis, Dinara ; Lemmon, Vance ; Bixby, John ; Hoogenraad, Casper C. ; Bradke, Frank. / Microtubule stabilization reduces scarring and causes axon regeneration after spinal cord injury. In: Science. 2011 ; Vol. 331, No. 6019. pp. 928-931.
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