Microdose gentamicin administration via the Round Window Microcatheter: Results in patients with Meniere's disease

Michael E Hoffer, Richard D. Kopke, Peter Weisskopf, Kim Gottshall, Keith Allen, Derin Wester

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

26 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Transtympanic gentamicin is becoming increasingly popular in the treatment of Meniere's disease. In this report we examine our experience with the use of microdose gentamicin via the Round Window Microcatheter for the treatment of Meniere's disease. Thirty-six patients were treated with gentamicin administration via the Round Window Microcatheter between July 1997 and August 2000. The patients all underwent 10 days of continuous treatment with a total dose of 2.4-3.75 mg of gentamicin (10 mg/ml). All patients had extensive pre-, intra-, and post-therapy auditory and vestibular testing. In this group, vertigo was eliminated in 89% of the patients, and tinnitus and pressure were significantly reduced in over 60% of the patients. Only one patient suffered a significant hearing loss and, most importantly, in all but one patient vestibular function was improved or normalized after treatment. Round Window Microcatheter-administered microdose gentamicin is an exciting new treatment for Meniere's disease. Preliminary results indicate that vertigo can be controlled without a significant reduction in cochlear or vestibular function in most patients. These results suggest that this therapy may be acting at a non-hair cell site. Our results are compared to the published literature examining transtympanic injection. In addition, the underlying science supporting this type of treatment is examined.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)46-51
Number of pages6
JournalAnnals of the New York Academy of Sciences
Volume942
StatePublished - 2001
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Meniere Disease
Gentamicins
Vertigo
Therapeutics
Audition
Cells
Tinnitus
Cochlea
Hearing Loss
Testing
Pressure
Injections

Keywords

  • Gentamicin
  • Meniere's disease
  • Sustained release
  • Vertigo

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)

Cite this

Microdose gentamicin administration via the Round Window Microcatheter : Results in patients with Meniere's disease. / Hoffer, Michael E; Kopke, Richard D.; Weisskopf, Peter; Gottshall, Kim; Allen, Keith; Wester, Derin.

In: Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences, Vol. 942, 2001, p. 46-51.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Hoffer, Michael E ; Kopke, Richard D. ; Weisskopf, Peter ; Gottshall, Kim ; Allen, Keith ; Wester, Derin. / Microdose gentamicin administration via the Round Window Microcatheter : Results in patients with Meniere's disease. In: Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences. 2001 ; Vol. 942. pp. 46-51.
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