Microcomputer servo-controlled bicycle ergometer system for psychophysiological research

A. R. Laperriere, D. H. VanDercar, L. Yu Shyu, M. F. Ward, Philip McCabe, Arlette Perry, P. E. Mosher, Neil Schneiderman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Steady state exercise is widely used for psychophysiological studies in which a constant heart rate at a predetermined level is desired. We have developed a microcomputer servo-controlled bicycle ergometer system that can be used for administering steady state exercise. Fourteen healthy male subjects, with a wide range of fitness levels (measured by V̇O(2max)) were exercised to either a fixed workload (130 watts) or a predetermined heart rate level (servo-heart rate) of 122 bpm (i.e., 65% of maximum calculated heart rate for the sample). Servo-heart rate was implemented using a feedback loop that automatically adjusted workload to compensate for immediate variations in heart rate, resulting in a more consistent heart rate. Heart rate varied from the predetermined value by 17 bpm during fixed workload but only 3 bpm during servo-heart rate (p < .05). Therefore, by using the microcomputer servo-controlled bicycle ergometer, heart rate was maintained at a predetermined level regardless of the subject's fitness level. V̇O(2max) and workload during servo-heart rate were significantly correlated (r = .85, p < .05). Therefore, the workload necessary to maintain heart rate at a constant level may provide an approximate index of aerobic fitness level.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)201-207
Number of pages7
JournalPsychophysiology
Volume26
Issue number2
StatePublished - Jan 1 1989

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Microcomputers
Heart Rate
Research
Workload
Exercise
Healthy Volunteers

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physiology
  • Physiology (medical)
  • Psychology(all)
  • Experimental and Cognitive Psychology
  • Neuropsychology and Physiological Psychology

Cite this

Microcomputer servo-controlled bicycle ergometer system for psychophysiological research. / Laperriere, A. R.; VanDercar, D. H.; Yu Shyu, L.; Ward, M. F.; McCabe, Philip; Perry, Arlette; Mosher, P. E.; Schneiderman, Neil.

In: Psychophysiology, Vol. 26, No. 2, 01.01.1989, p. 201-207.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Laperriere, AR, VanDercar, DH, Yu Shyu, L, Ward, MF, McCabe, P, Perry, A, Mosher, PE & Schneiderman, N 1989, 'Microcomputer servo-controlled bicycle ergometer system for psychophysiological research', Psychophysiology, vol. 26, no. 2, pp. 201-207.
Laperriere AR, VanDercar DH, Yu Shyu L, Ward MF, McCabe P, Perry A et al. Microcomputer servo-controlled bicycle ergometer system for psychophysiological research. Psychophysiology. 1989 Jan 1;26(2):201-207.
Laperriere, A. R. ; VanDercar, D. H. ; Yu Shyu, L. ; Ward, M. F. ; McCabe, Philip ; Perry, Arlette ; Mosher, P. E. ; Schneiderman, Neil. / Microcomputer servo-controlled bicycle ergometer system for psychophysiological research. In: Psychophysiology. 1989 ; Vol. 26, No. 2. pp. 201-207.
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