Metabolic Syndrome and Neurocognition Among Diverse Middle-Aged and Older Hispanics/Latinos: HCHS/SOL Results

Hector M. González, Wassim Tarraf, Priscilla Vásquez, Ashley H. Sanderlin, Natalya I. Rosenberg, Sonia Davis, Carlos J. Rodríguez, Linda C. Gallo, Bharat Thyagarajan, Martha Daviglus, Tasneem Khambaty, Jianwen Cai, Neil Schneiderman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: Hispanics/Latinos have the highest risks for metabolic syndrome (MetS) in the U.S. and are also at increased risk for Alzheimer disease. In this study, we examined associations among neurocognitive function, MetS, and inflammation among diverse middle-aged and older Hispanics/Latinos.

RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: Cross-sectional data (2008-2011) from the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos (HCHS/SOL) were analyzed to examine associations between neurocognition and MetS among diverse Hispanics/Latinos (N = 9,136; aged 45-74 years).

RESULTS: MetS status was associated with lower global neurocognition, mental status, verbal learning and memory, verbal fluency, and executive function. Age significantly modified the associations between MetS and learning and memory measures. Significant associations between MetS and neurocognition were observed among middle-aged Hispanics/Latinos, and all associations remained robust to additional covariates adjustment.

CONCLUSIONS: We found that MetS was associated with lower neurocognitive function, particularly in midlife. Our findings support and extend current hypotheses that midlife may be a particularly vulnerable developmental period for unhealthy neurocognitive aging.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1501-1509
Number of pages9
JournalDiabetes Care
Volume41
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2018

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Hispanic Americans
Health
Social Adjustment
Verbal Learning
Executive Function
Alzheimer Disease
Learning
Inflammation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Internal Medicine
  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism
  • Advanced and Specialized Nursing

Cite this

González, H. M., Tarraf, W., Vásquez, P., Sanderlin, A. H., Rosenberg, N. I., Davis, S., ... Schneiderman, N. (2018). Metabolic Syndrome and Neurocognition Among Diverse Middle-Aged and Older Hispanics/Latinos: HCHS/SOL Results. Diabetes Care, 41(7), 1501-1509. https://doi.org/10.2337/dc17-1896

Metabolic Syndrome and Neurocognition Among Diverse Middle-Aged and Older Hispanics/Latinos : HCHS/SOL Results. / González, Hector M.; Tarraf, Wassim; Vásquez, Priscilla; Sanderlin, Ashley H.; Rosenberg, Natalya I.; Davis, Sonia; Rodríguez, Carlos J.; Gallo, Linda C.; Thyagarajan, Bharat; Daviglus, Martha; Khambaty, Tasneem; Cai, Jianwen; Schneiderman, Neil.

In: Diabetes Care, Vol. 41, No. 7, 01.07.2018, p. 1501-1509.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

González, HM, Tarraf, W, Vásquez, P, Sanderlin, AH, Rosenberg, NI, Davis, S, Rodríguez, CJ, Gallo, LC, Thyagarajan, B, Daviglus, M, Khambaty, T, Cai, J & Schneiderman, N 2018, 'Metabolic Syndrome and Neurocognition Among Diverse Middle-Aged and Older Hispanics/Latinos: HCHS/SOL Results', Diabetes Care, vol. 41, no. 7, pp. 1501-1509. https://doi.org/10.2337/dc17-1896
González HM, Tarraf W, Vásquez P, Sanderlin AH, Rosenberg NI, Davis S et al. Metabolic Syndrome and Neurocognition Among Diverse Middle-Aged and Older Hispanics/Latinos: HCHS/SOL Results. Diabetes Care. 2018 Jul 1;41(7):1501-1509. https://doi.org/10.2337/dc17-1896
González, Hector M. ; Tarraf, Wassim ; Vásquez, Priscilla ; Sanderlin, Ashley H. ; Rosenberg, Natalya I. ; Davis, Sonia ; Rodríguez, Carlos J. ; Gallo, Linda C. ; Thyagarajan, Bharat ; Daviglus, Martha ; Khambaty, Tasneem ; Cai, Jianwen ; Schneiderman, Neil. / Metabolic Syndrome and Neurocognition Among Diverse Middle-Aged and Older Hispanics/Latinos : HCHS/SOL Results. In: Diabetes Care. 2018 ; Vol. 41, No. 7. pp. 1501-1509.
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N2 - OBJECTIVE: Hispanics/Latinos have the highest risks for metabolic syndrome (MetS) in the U.S. and are also at increased risk for Alzheimer disease. In this study, we examined associations among neurocognitive function, MetS, and inflammation among diverse middle-aged and older Hispanics/Latinos.RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: Cross-sectional data (2008-2011) from the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos (HCHS/SOL) were analyzed to examine associations between neurocognition and MetS among diverse Hispanics/Latinos (N = 9,136; aged 45-74 years).RESULTS: MetS status was associated with lower global neurocognition, mental status, verbal learning and memory, verbal fluency, and executive function. Age significantly modified the associations between MetS and learning and memory measures. Significant associations between MetS and neurocognition were observed among middle-aged Hispanics/Latinos, and all associations remained robust to additional covariates adjustment.CONCLUSIONS: We found that MetS was associated with lower neurocognitive function, particularly in midlife. Our findings support and extend current hypotheses that midlife may be a particularly vulnerable developmental period for unhealthy neurocognitive aging.

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