Memory and self-induced shocks in an evolutionary population competing for limited resources

Roland Kay, Neil F. Johnson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Scopus citations

Abstract

We present a detailed discussion of the role played by memory, and the nature of self-induced shocks, in an evolutionary population competing for limited resources. Our study builds on a previously introduced multiagent system [Phys. Rev. Lett. 82 3360 1999] which has attracted significant attention in the literature. This system exhibits self-segregation of the population based on the “gene” value [Formula presented] (where [Formula presented]), transitions to “frozen” populations as a function of the global resource level, and self-induced large changes which spontaneously arise as the dynamical system evolves. We find that the large, macroscopic self-induced shocks that arise are controlled by microscopic changes within extreme subgroups of the population (i.e., subgroups with “gene” values [Formula presented] and [Formula presented]).

Original languageEnglish (US)
Number of pages1
JournalPhysical Review E - Statistical Physics, Plasmas, Fluids, and Related Interdisciplinary Topics
Volume70
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2004

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Statistical and Nonlinear Physics
  • Statistics and Probability
  • Condensed Matter Physics

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Memory and self-induced shocks in an evolutionary population competing for limited resources'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this