Memory Accessibility, Mood Regulation, and Dysphoria: Difficulties in Repairing Sad Mood with Happy Memories?

Jutta Joormann, Matthias Siemer

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

198 Scopus citations

Abstract

Recent studies have suggested that mood-incongruency effects are due to mood-regulatory processes, in which people retrieve positive memories to repair negative moods. In Study 1, the authors investigated whether dysphoria influences the accessibility of autobiographical memories following a positive or a negative mood induction combined with subsequent rumination or distraction. The results showed a mood-repair effect for nondysphoric but not for dysphoric participants following rumination. In Study 2, participants were asked to either distract themselves or to recall positive autobiographical memories after a negative mood induction. Whereas nondysphoric participants' mood improved under both conditions, dysphoric participants' mood improved only after distraction. These results suggest that dysphoria is associated with a reduced ability to use mood-incongruent recall to repair sad moods.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)179-188
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of abnormal psychology
Volume113
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - May 2004

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Biological Psychiatry

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Memory Accessibility, Mood Regulation, and Dysphoria: Difficulties in Repairing Sad Mood with Happy Memories?'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this