Medical mistrust is related to lower longitudinal medication adherence among African-American males with HIV

Sannisha Dale, Laura M. Bogart, Glenn J. Wagner, Frank H. Galvan, David J. Klein

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

33 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

African-Americans living with HIV show worse health behaviors (e.g. medication adherence) and outcomes (e.g. viral suppression) than do their White counterparts. In a 6-month longitudinal study, we investigated whether medical mistrust among African-American males with HIV (214 enrolled, 140 with longitudinal data) predicted lower electronically monitored antiretroviral medication adherence. General medical mistrust (e.g. suspicion toward providers), but not racism-related mistrust (e.g. belief that providers treat African-Americans poorly due to race), predicted lower continuous medication adherence over time (b = -.08, standard error =.04, p =.03). Medical mistrust may contribute to poor health outcomes. Intervention efforts that address mistrust may improve adherence among African-Americans with HIV.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1311-1321
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of Health Psychology
Volume21
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2016
Externally publishedYes

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Medication Adherence
African Americans
HIV
Racism
Health Behavior
Longitudinal Studies
Health

Keywords

  • African-American males
  • beliefs
  • HIV
  • medical mistrust
  • medication adherence

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Applied Psychology

Cite this

Medical mistrust is related to lower longitudinal medication adherence among African-American males with HIV. / Dale, Sannisha; Bogart, Laura M.; Wagner, Glenn J.; Galvan, Frank H.; Klein, David J.

In: Journal of Health Psychology, Vol. 21, No. 7, 01.07.2016, p. 1311-1321.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Dale, Sannisha ; Bogart, Laura M. ; Wagner, Glenn J. ; Galvan, Frank H. ; Klein, David J. / Medical mistrust is related to lower longitudinal medication adherence among African-American males with HIV. In: Journal of Health Psychology. 2016 ; Vol. 21, No. 7. pp. 1311-1321.
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