Mediated effects of adult males’ perceived confirmation from father on relational partners’ communication apprehension

Michael Beatty, Jean A. Dobos

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In previous research, the degree to which men felt confirmed by their fathers significantly predicted their female relational partners’ reluctance about interacting with them. Drawing from the contemporary men’s literature and confirmation theory, men’s listening style—as determined by female partner’s reports—was advanced as a mediator of the confirmation‐partner aprehension relationship. Results of hierarchical regression analyses indicated (1) a direct effect of men’s perceived confirmation from father on their listening style, (2) a direct effect of men’s listening style on female partners’ discomfort while interacting with them, and (3) direct effects of female partners’ dyadic communication apprehension and men’s perceived confirmation apprehension and men’s perceived confirmation from father on female partners’ reluctance to communicate with their relational partners. Theoretical implications are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)207-214
Number of pages8
JournalSouthern Communication Journal
Volume58
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - 1993
Externally publishedYes

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father
communication
Communication
regression

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Communication

Cite this

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