Media exposure and attitudes toward drug addiction spending, 1975-2004

Amie L Nielsen, Scott Bonn

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

15 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In this article we examine the relationships between media exposure (television and newspaper) and drug addiction spending attitudes. Theory and research suggest the critical role of media for shaping views and influencing public opinion. However, no studies have considered media's impact for individual-level drug-related attitudes. We examine this using General Social Survey and other data from 1975 to 2004. Results from logistic regression analyses indicate that greater frequency of television viewing and of newspaper reading are associated with higher likelihoods of saying too little money is spent to address addiction. These findings are robust even when accounting for other factors.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)726-752
Number of pages27
JournalDeviant Behavior
Volume29
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2008

Fingerprint

Newspapers
drug dependence
Television
Substance-Related Disorders
television
newspaper
media impact
Public Opinion
addiction
public opinion
Reading
money
Logistic Models
logistics
Regression Analysis
drug
regression
Research
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Surveys and Questionnaires

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Psychology
  • Clinical Psychology
  • Sociology and Political Science
  • Law

Cite this

Media exposure and attitudes toward drug addiction spending, 1975-2004. / Nielsen, Amie L; Bonn, Scott.

In: Deviant Behavior, Vol. 29, No. 8, 01.11.2008, p. 726-752.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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