Mechanisms of the blood-brain barrier disruption in HIV-1 infection

Michal J Toborek, Yong Woo Lee, Govinder Flora, Hong Pu, Ibolya Edit Andras, Edward Wylegala, Bernhard Hennig, Avindra Nath

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

154 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

1. Alterations of brain microvasculature and the disruption of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) integrity are commonly associated with human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection. These changes are most frequently found in human immunodeficiency virus-related encephalitis (HIVE) and in human immunodeficiency virus-associated dementia (HAD). 2. It has been hypothesized that the disruption of the BBB occurs early in the course of HIV-1 infection and can be responsible for HIV-1 entry into the CNS. 3. The current review discusses the mechanisms of injury to brain endothelial cells and alterations of the BBB integrity in HIV-infection with focus on the vascular effects of HIV Tat protein. In addition, this review describes the mechanisms of the BBB disruption due to HIV-1 or Tat protein interaction with selected risk factors for HIV infection, such as substance abuse and aging.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)181-199
Number of pages19
JournalCellular and Molecular Neurobiology
Volume25
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2005
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Virus Diseases
Blood-Brain Barrier
Viruses
HIV-1
HIV Infections
Human Immunodeficiency Virus tat Gene Products
HIV
tat Gene Products
Human Immunodeficiency Virus Proteins
Virus Internalization
Brain
Encephalitis
Microvessels
Brain Injuries
Substance-Related Disorders
Blood Vessels
Dementia
Endothelial Cells
Endothelial cells
Aging of materials

Keywords

  • AIDS
  • Blood-brain barrier
  • Brain endothelial cells
  • HIV
  • Inflammatory responses
  • Tat
  • Tight junction

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)
  • Clinical Biochemistry
  • Cell Biology
  • Genetics

Cite this

Mechanisms of the blood-brain barrier disruption in HIV-1 infection. / Toborek, Michal J; Lee, Yong Woo; Flora, Govinder; Pu, Hong; Andras, Ibolya Edit; Wylegala, Edward; Hennig, Bernhard; Nath, Avindra.

In: Cellular and Molecular Neurobiology, Vol. 25, No. 1, 01.02.2005, p. 181-199.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Toborek, Michal J ; Lee, Yong Woo ; Flora, Govinder ; Pu, Hong ; Andras, Ibolya Edit ; Wylegala, Edward ; Hennig, Bernhard ; Nath, Avindra. / Mechanisms of the blood-brain barrier disruption in HIV-1 infection. In: Cellular and Molecular Neurobiology. 2005 ; Vol. 25, No. 1. pp. 181-199.
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