Mechanical properties of trabecular bone within and adjacent to osseous metastases

John A. Hipp, Andrew Rosenberg, Wilson C. Hayes

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

36 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Despite radiographic and histologic evidence of trabecular bone density changes within and adjacent to osseous metastases, there currently exist no data to demonstrate whether these changes are important in predict-ing the risk of fracture. To determine if these density changes result in significant reductions in mechanical properties, trabecular bone specimens were prepared from lower thoracic and lumbar vertebrae from two cadavers with radiographic, gross, and histologic evidence of lytic and/or blastic osseous metastases. Each specimen was classified as normal, lytic, or blastic based on appearance in fine-grain radiographs of 8-9 mm thick coronal plane sections. Specimens were tested to failure in uniaxial compression, and tissue and apparent densities were measured. Mean tissue densities were within normal ranges. The mean apparent density for all specimens combined was within the normal range for human vertebrae, and the mean apparent density for radiographically normal (0.131 g/ml) and lytic (0.111 g/ml) specimens was less than the mean apparent density of blastic (0.182 g/ml) specimens (p < 0.02). The moduli of lytic and blastic specimens were less than for normal specimens (p < 0.025). The strength of lytic specimens was less than normal (p = 0.057), but the strength of blastic specimens was not (p > 0.1). Apparent density explained significant fractions of the variations in both modulus (p < 0.001) and strength (p < 0.001). The data suggest that blastic changes associated with osseous metastases to trabecular bone disrupt the normal dependence of trabecular mechanical properties on apparent density, but lytic changes do not. These data also suggest that fracture risk predictors that utilize bone density to estimate stiffness or strength should adjust for the effects of metastases.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1165-1171
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Bone and Mineral Research
Volume7
Issue number10
StatePublished - Oct 1 1992
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Neoplasm Metastasis
Bone Density
Reference Values
Thoracic Vertebrae
Lumbar Vertebrae
Cadaver
Spine
Cancellous Bone

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery

Cite this

Mechanical properties of trabecular bone within and adjacent to osseous metastases. / Hipp, John A.; Rosenberg, Andrew; Hayes, Wilson C.

In: Journal of Bone and Mineral Research, Vol. 7, No. 10, 01.10.1992, p. 1165-1171.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{543693ba763e42ad87c27c53ecd442ae,
title = "Mechanical properties of trabecular bone within and adjacent to osseous metastases",
abstract = "Despite radiographic and histologic evidence of trabecular bone density changes within and adjacent to osseous metastases, there currently exist no data to demonstrate whether these changes are important in predict-ing the risk of fracture. To determine if these density changes result in significant reductions in mechanical properties, trabecular bone specimens were prepared from lower thoracic and lumbar vertebrae from two cadavers with radiographic, gross, and histologic evidence of lytic and/or blastic osseous metastases. Each specimen was classified as normal, lytic, or blastic based on appearance in fine-grain radiographs of 8-9 mm thick coronal plane sections. Specimens were tested to failure in uniaxial compression, and tissue and apparent densities were measured. Mean tissue densities were within normal ranges. The mean apparent density for all specimens combined was within the normal range for human vertebrae, and the mean apparent density for radiographically normal (0.131 g/ml) and lytic (0.111 g/ml) specimens was less than the mean apparent density of blastic (0.182 g/ml) specimens (p < 0.02). The moduli of lytic and blastic specimens were less than for normal specimens (p < 0.025). The strength of lytic specimens was less than normal (p = 0.057), but the strength of blastic specimens was not (p > 0.1). Apparent density explained significant fractions of the variations in both modulus (p < 0.001) and strength (p < 0.001). The data suggest that blastic changes associated with osseous metastases to trabecular bone disrupt the normal dependence of trabecular mechanical properties on apparent density, but lytic changes do not. These data also suggest that fracture risk predictors that utilize bone density to estimate stiffness or strength should adjust for the effects of metastases.",
author = "Hipp, {John A.} and Andrew Rosenberg and Hayes, {Wilson C.}",
year = "1992",
month = "10",
day = "1",
language = "English",
volume = "7",
pages = "1165--1171",
journal = "Journal of Bone and Mineral Research",
issn = "0884-0431",
publisher = "Wiley-Blackwell",
number = "10",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Mechanical properties of trabecular bone within and adjacent to osseous metastases

AU - Hipp, John A.

AU - Rosenberg, Andrew

AU - Hayes, Wilson C.

PY - 1992/10/1

Y1 - 1992/10/1

N2 - Despite radiographic and histologic evidence of trabecular bone density changes within and adjacent to osseous metastases, there currently exist no data to demonstrate whether these changes are important in predict-ing the risk of fracture. To determine if these density changes result in significant reductions in mechanical properties, trabecular bone specimens were prepared from lower thoracic and lumbar vertebrae from two cadavers with radiographic, gross, and histologic evidence of lytic and/or blastic osseous metastases. Each specimen was classified as normal, lytic, or blastic based on appearance in fine-grain radiographs of 8-9 mm thick coronal plane sections. Specimens were tested to failure in uniaxial compression, and tissue and apparent densities were measured. Mean tissue densities were within normal ranges. The mean apparent density for all specimens combined was within the normal range for human vertebrae, and the mean apparent density for radiographically normal (0.131 g/ml) and lytic (0.111 g/ml) specimens was less than the mean apparent density of blastic (0.182 g/ml) specimens (p < 0.02). The moduli of lytic and blastic specimens were less than for normal specimens (p < 0.025). The strength of lytic specimens was less than normal (p = 0.057), but the strength of blastic specimens was not (p > 0.1). Apparent density explained significant fractions of the variations in both modulus (p < 0.001) and strength (p < 0.001). The data suggest that blastic changes associated with osseous metastases to trabecular bone disrupt the normal dependence of trabecular mechanical properties on apparent density, but lytic changes do not. These data also suggest that fracture risk predictors that utilize bone density to estimate stiffness or strength should adjust for the effects of metastases.

AB - Despite radiographic and histologic evidence of trabecular bone density changes within and adjacent to osseous metastases, there currently exist no data to demonstrate whether these changes are important in predict-ing the risk of fracture. To determine if these density changes result in significant reductions in mechanical properties, trabecular bone specimens were prepared from lower thoracic and lumbar vertebrae from two cadavers with radiographic, gross, and histologic evidence of lytic and/or blastic osseous metastases. Each specimen was classified as normal, lytic, or blastic based on appearance in fine-grain radiographs of 8-9 mm thick coronal plane sections. Specimens were tested to failure in uniaxial compression, and tissue and apparent densities were measured. Mean tissue densities were within normal ranges. The mean apparent density for all specimens combined was within the normal range for human vertebrae, and the mean apparent density for radiographically normal (0.131 g/ml) and lytic (0.111 g/ml) specimens was less than the mean apparent density of blastic (0.182 g/ml) specimens (p < 0.02). The moduli of lytic and blastic specimens were less than for normal specimens (p < 0.025). The strength of lytic specimens was less than normal (p = 0.057), but the strength of blastic specimens was not (p > 0.1). Apparent density explained significant fractions of the variations in both modulus (p < 0.001) and strength (p < 0.001). The data suggest that blastic changes associated with osseous metastases to trabecular bone disrupt the normal dependence of trabecular mechanical properties on apparent density, but lytic changes do not. These data also suggest that fracture risk predictors that utilize bone density to estimate stiffness or strength should adjust for the effects of metastases.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0026462663&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0026462663&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

C2 - 1456084

AN - SCOPUS:0026462663

VL - 7

SP - 1165

EP - 1171

JO - Journal of Bone and Mineral Research

JF - Journal of Bone and Mineral Research

SN - 0884-0431

IS - 10

ER -