Mechanical and hydraulic properties of wax-coated sands for sport surfaces

Jean-Pierre Bardet, C. Benazza, J. F. Bruchon, M. Mishra

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Natural soils such as sandy loams are being replaced by synthetic soils for various types of sport and recreational surfaces, including horseracing tracks. These synthetic soils are made of a mixture of sand, microcrystalline wax, synthetic fibers and rubber chips which optimize the mechanical and hydraulic properties of natural soils so that they drain faster after rainstorms and decrease risks of sport injuries while retaining appropriate sport performances. Silica sand, which makes up the largest fraction of synthetic soils, is hydrophyllic by nature, i.e., tends to retain water on sand grain surfaces. After rainstorms, hydrophilic surfaces retain a large amount of water, are difficult to compact, and yield uncontrollable mechanical and hydraulic properties when too moist. The addition of wax contributes to improving both mechanical and hydraulic properties of sands. Wax coats the sand grains with a thin layer, and enhances adherence between sand particles. It repels water from sand grains and influences both compaction and hydraulic properties. This study reports experimental results that help to understand the properties of wax-coated sands used in synthetic surfaces, especially the degradation of synthetic surfaces that have insufficient wax-coatings.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationAIP Conference Proceedings
Pages792-795
Number of pages4
Volume1145
DOIs
StatePublished - 2009
Externally publishedYes
Event6th International Conference on Micromechanics of Granular Media, Powders and Grains 2009 - Golden, CO, United States
Duration: Jul 13 2009Jul 17 2009

Other

Other6th International Conference on Micromechanics of Granular Media, Powders and Grains 2009
CountryUnited States
CityGolden, CO
Period7/13/097/17/09

Fingerprint

waxes
hydraulics
sands
mechanical properties
soils
rainstorms
synthetic rubbers
synthetic fibers
water
retaining
chips
degradation
silicon dioxide
coatings

Keywords

  • Compaction
  • Drainage
  • Permeability
  • Synthetic sport surfaces
  • Water content
  • Wax-coated sands

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physics and Astronomy(all)

Cite this

Bardet, J-P., Benazza, C., Bruchon, J. F., & Mishra, M. (2009). Mechanical and hydraulic properties of wax-coated sands for sport surfaces. In AIP Conference Proceedings (Vol. 1145, pp. 792-795) https://doi.org/10.1063/1.3180047

Mechanical and hydraulic properties of wax-coated sands for sport surfaces. / Bardet, Jean-Pierre; Benazza, C.; Bruchon, J. F.; Mishra, M.

AIP Conference Proceedings. Vol. 1145 2009. p. 792-795.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Bardet, J-P, Benazza, C, Bruchon, JF & Mishra, M 2009, Mechanical and hydraulic properties of wax-coated sands for sport surfaces. in AIP Conference Proceedings. vol. 1145, pp. 792-795, 6th International Conference on Micromechanics of Granular Media, Powders and Grains 2009, Golden, CO, United States, 7/13/09. https://doi.org/10.1063/1.3180047
Bardet J-P, Benazza C, Bruchon JF, Mishra M. Mechanical and hydraulic properties of wax-coated sands for sport surfaces. In AIP Conference Proceedings. Vol. 1145. 2009. p. 792-795 https://doi.org/10.1063/1.3180047
Bardet, Jean-Pierre ; Benazza, C. ; Bruchon, J. F. ; Mishra, M. / Mechanical and hydraulic properties of wax-coated sands for sport surfaces. AIP Conference Proceedings. Vol. 1145 2009. pp. 792-795
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