Measuring use of health services for at-risk drinkers: How brief can you get?

Brenda M. Booth, JoAnn E. Kirchner, Stacy M. Fortney, Xiaotong Han, Carol R. Thrush, Michael French

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study examines the validity, utility, and costs of using a brief telephone-administered instrument, the Brief Health Services Questionnaire (BHSQ), for self-reported health care provider contacts relative to collection and abstraction of complete medical records. The study sample was 441 community-dwelling at-risk drinkers who participated in an 18-month longitudinal study. Agreement between BHSQ self-reports and abstracted provider contacts was good to very good for general medical (79% agreement, kappa = .50) and specialty mental health contacts (93% agreement, kappa = .62), but low for "other" miscellaneous health contacts (61% agreement, kappa = .04). Average cost to collect and abstract complete medical records was $424 per study participant, whereas average cost to administer only the BHSQ was $31 per participant. Although it is not possible to conduct a formal cost-effectiveness analysis, results suggest the BHSQ is a viable option for collecting self-reported health provider contacts in a sample of at-risk drinkers, with definite cost advantages over more elaborate data collection methods.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)254-264
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of Behavioral Health Services and Research
Volume33
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 2006

Fingerprint

Health Services
health service
contact
Costs and Cost Analysis
costs
questionnaire
Medical Records
Independent Living
Health
Telephone
Health Personnel
Self Report
data collection method
Cost-Benefit Analysis
Longitudinal Studies
Mental Health
abstraction
health
telephone
longitudinal study

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health(social science)
  • Health Professions(all)

Cite this

Measuring use of health services for at-risk drinkers : How brief can you get? / Booth, Brenda M.; Kirchner, JoAnn E.; Fortney, Stacy M.; Han, Xiaotong; Thrush, Carol R.; French, Michael.

In: Journal of Behavioral Health Services and Research, Vol. 33, No. 2, 04.2006, p. 254-264.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Booth, Brenda M. ; Kirchner, JoAnn E. ; Fortney, Stacy M. ; Han, Xiaotong ; Thrush, Carol R. ; French, Michael. / Measuring use of health services for at-risk drinkers : How brief can you get?. In: Journal of Behavioral Health Services and Research. 2006 ; Vol. 33, No. 2. pp. 254-264.
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