Measuring diabetes self-care: A psychometric analysis of the Self-Care Inventory-revised with adults

Katie Weinger, Heather A. Butler, Garry W. Welch, Annette M La Greca

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

166 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

OBJECTIVE - To examine psychometric properties of the Self-Care Inventory-revised (SCI-R), a self-report measure of perceived adherence to diabetes self-care recommendations, among adults with diabetes. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS - We used three data sets of adult type 1 and type 2 diabetic patients to examine psychometric properties of the SCI-R. Principal component and factor analyses examined whether a general factor or common factors were present. Associations with measures of theoretically related concepts were examined to assess SCI-R concurrent and convergent validity. Internal reliability coefficients were calculated. Responsiveness was assessed using paired t tests, effect size, and Guyatt's statistic for type 1 patients who completed psychoeducation. RESULTS - Principal component and factor analyses identified a general factor but no consistent common factors. Internal consistency of the SCI-R was α = 0.87. Correlation with a measure of frequency of diabetes self-care behaviors was r = 0.63, providing evidence for SCI-R concurrent validity. The SCI-R correlated with diabetes-related distress (r = -0.36), self-esteem (r = 0.25), self-efficacy (r = 0.47), depression (r = -0.22), anxiety (r = -0.24), and HbA1c (r = -0.37), supporting construct validity. Responsiveness analyses showed SCI-R scores improved with diabetes psychoeducation with a medium effect size of 0.62 and a Guyatt's statistic of 0.85. CONCLUSIONS - The SCI-R is a brief, psychometrically sound measure of perceptions of adherence to recommended diabetes self-care behaviors of adults with type 1 or type 2 diabetes.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1346-1352
Number of pages7
JournalDiabetes Care
Volume28
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2005

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Self Care
Psychometrics
Equipment and Supplies
Principal Component Analysis
Statistical Factor Analysis
Self Efficacy
Self Concept
Self Report
Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus
Research Design
Anxiety
Depression

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Internal Medicine
  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism

Cite this

Measuring diabetes self-care : A psychometric analysis of the Self-Care Inventory-revised with adults. / Weinger, Katie; Butler, Heather A.; Welch, Garry W.; La Greca, Annette M.

In: Diabetes Care, Vol. 28, No. 6, 01.06.2005, p. 1346-1352.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Weinger, Katie ; Butler, Heather A. ; Welch, Garry W. ; La Greca, Annette M. / Measuring diabetes self-care : A psychometric analysis of the Self-Care Inventory-revised with adults. In: Diabetes Care. 2005 ; Vol. 28, No. 6. pp. 1346-1352.
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