Math and science education comparisons between the United States and the rest of the world

Kaufui V. Wong, Baochan D. Do, William Hagen

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

At the end of secondary education, the students of the United States are behind most advanced countries in science and mathematics. The main problem lies in the fact that the United States education system does not have a clear focus in their teaching of math and science through primary and secondary schools. According to the United States Department of Education, only 22 of the 50 states in the U.S. require that three years of math and science be taught in order to graduate from high school. This puts students of the United States at a disadvantage against the rest of the competitors on the global marketplace. This lack of uniformity in the United States is the reason that high school graduates are behind other developed countries in their math and science scores and subsequently less Americans are graduating from universities in the sciences. These facts could contribute detrimentally to the economic progress in the United Stales. To remedy this lack of American scientists and engineers, the United States needs to have a comprehensive system to encourage the study of math and science from primary school all the way to implementation in the economic marketplace.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publication2008 Proceedings of the ASME International Mechanical Engineering Congress and Exposition, IMECE 2008
Pages159-165
Number of pages7
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 17 2009
Event2008 ASME International Mechanical Engineering Congress and Exposition, IMECE 2008 - Boston, MA, United States
Duration: Oct 31 2008Nov 6 2008

Publication series

NameASME International Mechanical Engineering Congress and Exposition, Proceedings
Volume9

Other

Other2008 ASME International Mechanical Engineering Congress and Exposition, IMECE 2008
CountryUnited States
CityBoston, MA
Period10/31/0811/6/08

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Mechanical Engineering

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    Wong, K. V., Do, B. D., & Hagen, W. (2009). Math and science education comparisons between the United States and the rest of the world. In 2008 Proceedings of the ASME International Mechanical Engineering Congress and Exposition, IMECE 2008 (pp. 159-165). (ASME International Mechanical Engineering Congress and Exposition, Proceedings; Vol. 9). https://doi.org/10.1115/IMECE2008-67317