Maternal-infant response to variable foraging demand in nonhuman primates: Effects of timing of stressor on cerebrospinal fluid corticotropin-releasing factor and circulating glucocorticoid concentrations

Jeremy D. Coplan, Eric L P Smith, Margaret Altemus, Sanjay J. Mathew, Tarique Perera, John G. Kral, Jack M. Gorman, Michael J. Owens, Charles Nemeroff, Leonard A. Rosenblum

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

23 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The maternal stress response may vary as a function of infant developmental phase. Using a median split, 13 bonnet macaque (M. radiata) mother-infant dyads were exposed to early initiation of variable foraging demand (VFD), a prolonged stressor, whereas 11 dyads were exposed to late VFD onset. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and plasma samples were obtained from mothers and infants prior to and following VFD. Increases in maternal CSF corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) concentrations were evident in response to late, but not early, VFD. Mothers exhibited either increased or decreased cortisol concentrations in response to VFD. However, absolute cortisol change was greater in early versus late VFD. Timing of the VFD stressor differentially affects maternal neuroendocrine response, with potential implications for the offspring's developmental trajectory.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)525-533
Number of pages9
JournalAnnals of the New York Academy of Sciences
Volume1071
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2006
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Cerebrospinal fluid
Corticotropin-Releasing Hormone
Primates
Glucocorticoids
Cerebrospinal Fluid
Hydrocortisone
Mothers
Trajectories
Plasmas
Macaca radiata
Foraging
Nonhuman Primate

Keywords

  • Corticotropin-releasing factor
  • Cortisol
  • Infant development
  • Maternal
  • Nonhuman primates
  • Variable foraging demand

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)

Cite this

Maternal-infant response to variable foraging demand in nonhuman primates : Effects of timing of stressor on cerebrospinal fluid corticotropin-releasing factor and circulating glucocorticoid concentrations. / Coplan, Jeremy D.; Smith, Eric L P; Altemus, Margaret; Mathew, Sanjay J.; Perera, Tarique; Kral, John G.; Gorman, Jack M.; Owens, Michael J.; Nemeroff, Charles; Rosenblum, Leonard A.

In: Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences, Vol. 1071, 01.07.2006, p. 525-533.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Coplan, Jeremy D. ; Smith, Eric L P ; Altemus, Margaret ; Mathew, Sanjay J. ; Perera, Tarique ; Kral, John G. ; Gorman, Jack M. ; Owens, Michael J. ; Nemeroff, Charles ; Rosenblum, Leonard A. / Maternal-infant response to variable foraging demand in nonhuman primates : Effects of timing of stressor on cerebrospinal fluid corticotropin-releasing factor and circulating glucocorticoid concentrations. In: Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences. 2006 ; Vol. 1071. pp. 525-533.
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