Maternal calcium intake and offspring blood pressure

Matthew W. Gillman, Sheryl L. Rifas-Shiman, Ken P. Kleinman, Janet W. Rich-Edwards, Steven E Lipshultz

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

60 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background - Few data exist on the intergenerational influence of calcium intake during pregnancy on offspring blood pressure. Methods and Results - As part of the ongoing US prospective cohort study Project Viva, we analyzed 4091 Dinamap blood pressure measurements from 936 six-month-old infants whose mothers had completed food frequency questionnaires during the second trimester of pregnancy. We used mixed models to estimate effects of maternal calcium intake on offspring systolic blood pressure. Mean±SD daily total maternal calcium intake was 1494±523 mg, consisting of 1230±486 mg from foods and 264±191 mg from supplements. Mean±SD 6-month blood pressure was 89.9±12.9 mm Hg. From bottom to top quartile of dietary calcium from foods adjusted for energy intake and measurement conditions, mean infant systolic blood pressures were 91.0, 90.2, 90.9, and 90.2 mm Hg (trend P=0.62). From calcium supplements only, the values were 91.5, 90.2, 90.4, and 88.4 mm Hg (trend P=0.006). After further adjustment for demographic, anthropometric, dietary, social, and economic variables, the decrease in 6-month systolic blood pressure was -3.0 mm Hg (95% CI, -4.9 to -1.1) for each 500-mg increment of maternal supplemental calcium intake during pregnancy. We did not find evidence of effect modification by maternal vitamin D or potassium intake or by infant body mass index. First-trimester calcium intake was not associated with offspring blood pressure. Conclusions - These observational data suggest that supplementing maternal midgestational calcium intake may lower offspring blood pressure, thus helping to prevent hypertension in the next generation.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1990-1995
Number of pages6
JournalCirculation
Volume110
Issue number14
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 5 2004

Fingerprint

Mothers
Blood Pressure
Calcium
Food
Dietary Calcium
Pregnancy
Second Pregnancy Trimester
First Pregnancy Trimester
Energy Intake
Vitamin D
Potassium
Body Mass Index
Cohort Studies
Economics
Demography
Prospective Studies
Hypertension

Keywords

  • Blood pressure
  • Calcium
  • Pediatrics
  • Pregnancy

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physiology
  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

Cite this

Gillman, M. W., Rifas-Shiman, S. L., Kleinman, K. P., Rich-Edwards, J. W., & Lipshultz, S. E. (2004). Maternal calcium intake and offspring blood pressure. Circulation, 110(14), 1990-1995. https://doi.org/10.1161/01.CIR.0000143199.93495.96

Maternal calcium intake and offspring blood pressure. / Gillman, Matthew W.; Rifas-Shiman, Sheryl L.; Kleinman, Ken P.; Rich-Edwards, Janet W.; Lipshultz, Steven E.

In: Circulation, Vol. 110, No. 14, 05.10.2004, p. 1990-1995.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Gillman, MW, Rifas-Shiman, SL, Kleinman, KP, Rich-Edwards, JW & Lipshultz, SE 2004, 'Maternal calcium intake and offspring blood pressure', Circulation, vol. 110, no. 14, pp. 1990-1995. https://doi.org/10.1161/01.CIR.0000143199.93495.96
Gillman MW, Rifas-Shiman SL, Kleinman KP, Rich-Edwards JW, Lipshultz SE. Maternal calcium intake and offspring blood pressure. Circulation. 2004 Oct 5;110(14):1990-1995. https://doi.org/10.1161/01.CIR.0000143199.93495.96
Gillman, Matthew W. ; Rifas-Shiman, Sheryl L. ; Kleinman, Ken P. ; Rich-Edwards, Janet W. ; Lipshultz, Steven E. / Maternal calcium intake and offspring blood pressure. In: Circulation. 2004 ; Vol. 110, No. 14. pp. 1990-1995.
@article{c8e74a989f8e4acaa3525fc6e6f1e66e,
title = "Maternal calcium intake and offspring blood pressure",
abstract = "Background - Few data exist on the intergenerational influence of calcium intake during pregnancy on offspring blood pressure. Methods and Results - As part of the ongoing US prospective cohort study Project Viva, we analyzed 4091 Dinamap blood pressure measurements from 936 six-month-old infants whose mothers had completed food frequency questionnaires during the second trimester of pregnancy. We used mixed models to estimate effects of maternal calcium intake on offspring systolic blood pressure. Mean±SD daily total maternal calcium intake was 1494±523 mg, consisting of 1230±486 mg from foods and 264±191 mg from supplements. Mean±SD 6-month blood pressure was 89.9±12.9 mm Hg. From bottom to top quartile of dietary calcium from foods adjusted for energy intake and measurement conditions, mean infant systolic blood pressures were 91.0, 90.2, 90.9, and 90.2 mm Hg (trend P=0.62). From calcium supplements only, the values were 91.5, 90.2, 90.4, and 88.4 mm Hg (trend P=0.006). After further adjustment for demographic, anthropometric, dietary, social, and economic variables, the decrease in 6-month systolic blood pressure was -3.0 mm Hg (95{\%} CI, -4.9 to -1.1) for each 500-mg increment of maternal supplemental calcium intake during pregnancy. We did not find evidence of effect modification by maternal vitamin D or potassium intake or by infant body mass index. First-trimester calcium intake was not associated with offspring blood pressure. Conclusions - These observational data suggest that supplementing maternal midgestational calcium intake may lower offspring blood pressure, thus helping to prevent hypertension in the next generation.",
keywords = "Blood pressure, Calcium, Pediatrics, Pregnancy",
author = "Gillman, {Matthew W.} and Rifas-Shiman, {Sheryl L.} and Kleinman, {Ken P.} and Rich-Edwards, {Janet W.} and Lipshultz, {Steven E}",
year = "2004",
month = "10",
day = "5",
doi = "10.1161/01.CIR.0000143199.93495.96",
language = "English",
volume = "110",
pages = "1990--1995",
journal = "Circulation",
issn = "0009-7322",
publisher = "Lippincott Williams and Wilkins",
number = "14",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Maternal calcium intake and offspring blood pressure

AU - Gillman, Matthew W.

AU - Rifas-Shiman, Sheryl L.

AU - Kleinman, Ken P.

AU - Rich-Edwards, Janet W.

AU - Lipshultz, Steven E

PY - 2004/10/5

Y1 - 2004/10/5

N2 - Background - Few data exist on the intergenerational influence of calcium intake during pregnancy on offspring blood pressure. Methods and Results - As part of the ongoing US prospective cohort study Project Viva, we analyzed 4091 Dinamap blood pressure measurements from 936 six-month-old infants whose mothers had completed food frequency questionnaires during the second trimester of pregnancy. We used mixed models to estimate effects of maternal calcium intake on offspring systolic blood pressure. Mean±SD daily total maternal calcium intake was 1494±523 mg, consisting of 1230±486 mg from foods and 264±191 mg from supplements. Mean±SD 6-month blood pressure was 89.9±12.9 mm Hg. From bottom to top quartile of dietary calcium from foods adjusted for energy intake and measurement conditions, mean infant systolic blood pressures were 91.0, 90.2, 90.9, and 90.2 mm Hg (trend P=0.62). From calcium supplements only, the values were 91.5, 90.2, 90.4, and 88.4 mm Hg (trend P=0.006). After further adjustment for demographic, anthropometric, dietary, social, and economic variables, the decrease in 6-month systolic blood pressure was -3.0 mm Hg (95% CI, -4.9 to -1.1) for each 500-mg increment of maternal supplemental calcium intake during pregnancy. We did not find evidence of effect modification by maternal vitamin D or potassium intake or by infant body mass index. First-trimester calcium intake was not associated with offspring blood pressure. Conclusions - These observational data suggest that supplementing maternal midgestational calcium intake may lower offspring blood pressure, thus helping to prevent hypertension in the next generation.

AB - Background - Few data exist on the intergenerational influence of calcium intake during pregnancy on offspring blood pressure. Methods and Results - As part of the ongoing US prospective cohort study Project Viva, we analyzed 4091 Dinamap blood pressure measurements from 936 six-month-old infants whose mothers had completed food frequency questionnaires during the second trimester of pregnancy. We used mixed models to estimate effects of maternal calcium intake on offspring systolic blood pressure. Mean±SD daily total maternal calcium intake was 1494±523 mg, consisting of 1230±486 mg from foods and 264±191 mg from supplements. Mean±SD 6-month blood pressure was 89.9±12.9 mm Hg. From bottom to top quartile of dietary calcium from foods adjusted for energy intake and measurement conditions, mean infant systolic blood pressures were 91.0, 90.2, 90.9, and 90.2 mm Hg (trend P=0.62). From calcium supplements only, the values were 91.5, 90.2, 90.4, and 88.4 mm Hg (trend P=0.006). After further adjustment for demographic, anthropometric, dietary, social, and economic variables, the decrease in 6-month systolic blood pressure was -3.0 mm Hg (95% CI, -4.9 to -1.1) for each 500-mg increment of maternal supplemental calcium intake during pregnancy. We did not find evidence of effect modification by maternal vitamin D or potassium intake or by infant body mass index. First-trimester calcium intake was not associated with offspring blood pressure. Conclusions - These observational data suggest that supplementing maternal midgestational calcium intake may lower offspring blood pressure, thus helping to prevent hypertension in the next generation.

KW - Blood pressure

KW - Calcium

KW - Pediatrics

KW - Pregnancy

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=4944223120&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=4944223120&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1161/01.CIR.0000143199.93495.96

DO - 10.1161/01.CIR.0000143199.93495.96

M3 - Article

C2 - 15451777

AN - SCOPUS:4944223120

VL - 110

SP - 1990

EP - 1995

JO - Circulation

JF - Circulation

SN - 0009-7322

IS - 14

ER -