Massage therapy effects on depressed pregnant women

Tiffany M Field, Miguel A Diego, M. Hernandez-Reif, S. Schanberg, C. Kuhn

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

107 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Eighty-four depressed pregnant women were recruited during the second trimester of pregnancy and randomly assigned to a massage therapy group, a progressive muscle relaxation group or a control group that received standard prenatal care alone. These groups were compared to each other and to a non-depressed group at the end of pregnancy. The massage therapy group participants received two 20 min therapy sessions by their significant others each week for 16 weeks of pregnancy, starting during the second trimester. The relaxation group provided themselves with progressive muscle relaxation sessions on the same time schedule. Immediately after the massage therapy sessions on the first and last days of the 16-week period the women reported lower levels of anxiety and depressed mood and less leg and back pain. By the end of the study the massage group had higher dopamine and serotonin levels and lower levels of cortisol and norepinephrine. These changes may have contributed to the reduced fetal activity and the better neonatal outcome for the massage group (i.e. lesser incidence of prematurity and low birthweight), as well as their better performance on the Brazelton Neonatal Behavior Assessment. The data suggest that depressed pregnant women and their offspring can benefit from massage therapy.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)115-122
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Psychosomatic Obstetrics and Gynecology
Volume25
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2004

Fingerprint

Massage
Pregnant Women
Autogenic Training
Second Pregnancy Trimester
Fetal Movement
Pregnancy
Prenatal Care
Back Pain
Hydrocortisone
Dopamine
Leg
Serotonin
Norepinephrine
Appointments and Schedules
Anxiety
Control Groups
Incidence

Keywords

  • Anxiety
  • Depression
  • EEG
  • Massage therapy
  • Pregnancy
  • Stress hormones

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Obstetrics and Gynecology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Reproductive Medicine
  • Clinical Psychology

Cite this

Massage therapy effects on depressed pregnant women. / Field, Tiffany M; Diego, Miguel A; Hernandez-Reif, M.; Schanberg, S.; Kuhn, C.

In: Journal of Psychosomatic Obstetrics and Gynecology, Vol. 25, No. 2, 01.06.2004, p. 115-122.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Field, Tiffany M ; Diego, Miguel A ; Hernandez-Reif, M. ; Schanberg, S. ; Kuhn, C. / Massage therapy effects on depressed pregnant women. In: Journal of Psychosomatic Obstetrics and Gynecology. 2004 ; Vol. 25, No. 2. pp. 115-122.
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