Massage Therapy Effects

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

274 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Massage therapy is older than recorded time, and rubbing was the primary form of medicine until the pharmaceutical revolution of the 1940s. Popularized again as part of the alternative medicine movement, massage therapy has recently received empirical support for facilitating growth, reducing pain, increasing alertness, diminishing depression, and enhancing immune function. In this article studies are reviewed that document these effects, and models are proposed for potential underlying mechanisms.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1270-1281
Number of pages12
JournalAmerican Psychologist
Volume53
Issue number12
StatePublished - Dec 1 1998

Fingerprint

Massage
Complementary Therapies
Medicine
Depression
Pain
Growth
Pharmaceutical Preparations

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychology(all)

Cite this

Massage Therapy Effects. / Field, Tiffany M.

In: American Psychologist, Vol. 53, No. 12, 01.12.1998, p. 1270-1281.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Field, TM 1998, 'Massage Therapy Effects', American Psychologist, vol. 53, no. 12, pp. 1270-1281.
Field, Tiffany M. / Massage Therapy Effects. In: American Psychologist. 1998 ; Vol. 53, No. 12. pp. 1270-1281.
@article{81510549dfe14146bbf657831123211d,
title = "Massage Therapy Effects",
abstract = "Massage therapy is older than recorded time, and rubbing was the primary form of medicine until the pharmaceutical revolution of the 1940s. Popularized again as part of the alternative medicine movement, massage therapy has recently received empirical support for facilitating growth, reducing pain, increasing alertness, diminishing depression, and enhancing immune function. In this article studies are reviewed that document these effects, and models are proposed for potential underlying mechanisms.",
author = "Field, {Tiffany M}",
year = "1998",
month = "12",
day = "1",
language = "English",
volume = "53",
pages = "1270--1281",
journal = "American Psychologist",
issn = "0003-066X",
publisher = "American Psychological Association Inc.",
number = "12",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Massage Therapy Effects

AU - Field, Tiffany M

PY - 1998/12/1

Y1 - 1998/12/1

N2 - Massage therapy is older than recorded time, and rubbing was the primary form of medicine until the pharmaceutical revolution of the 1940s. Popularized again as part of the alternative medicine movement, massage therapy has recently received empirical support for facilitating growth, reducing pain, increasing alertness, diminishing depression, and enhancing immune function. In this article studies are reviewed that document these effects, and models are proposed for potential underlying mechanisms.

AB - Massage therapy is older than recorded time, and rubbing was the primary form of medicine until the pharmaceutical revolution of the 1940s. Popularized again as part of the alternative medicine movement, massage therapy has recently received empirical support for facilitating growth, reducing pain, increasing alertness, diminishing depression, and enhancing immune function. In this article studies are reviewed that document these effects, and models are proposed for potential underlying mechanisms.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0032246811&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0032246811&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

C2 - 9872050

AN - SCOPUS:0032246811

VL - 53

SP - 1270

EP - 1281

JO - American Psychologist

JF - American Psychologist

SN - 0003-066X

IS - 12

ER -