MANAGEMENT OF COASTAL ZONE RESOURCES IN PANAMA.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Since independence in 1903, Panama has constructed an interoceanic canal and oil pipeline, established a fishing fleet, built access roads to much of the Pacific shoreline, and developed mechanized agriculture on the Pacific coastal plain. The population of the capital and principal port, Panama City, has grown from 22,000 to more than 600,000 during the period from 1905 to 1980. These factors demand effective regulation of coastal resources by governmental institutions. The present situation is far from ideal. Structural changes in the institutions with jurisdiction in the coastal zone could avoid the irreversible degradation of these resources which are indispensable for the economy, ecology, public health, and beauty of Panama.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationUnknown Host Publication Title
PublisherASCE
Pages1130-1145
Number of pages16
Volume1
ISBN (Print)0872626024
StatePublished - 1987
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Coastal zones
Public health
Canals
Ecology
Agriculture
Pipelines
Degradation
Oils

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Engineering(all)

Cite this

Suman, D. O. (1987). MANAGEMENT OF COASTAL ZONE RESOURCES IN PANAMA. In Unknown Host Publication Title (Vol. 1, pp. 1130-1145). ASCE.

MANAGEMENT OF COASTAL ZONE RESOURCES IN PANAMA. / Suman, Daniel O.

Unknown Host Publication Title. Vol. 1 ASCE, 1987. p. 1130-1145.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Suman, DO 1987, MANAGEMENT OF COASTAL ZONE RESOURCES IN PANAMA. in Unknown Host Publication Title. vol. 1, ASCE, pp. 1130-1145.
Suman DO. MANAGEMENT OF COASTAL ZONE RESOURCES IN PANAMA. In Unknown Host Publication Title. Vol. 1. ASCE. 1987. p. 1130-1145
Suman, Daniel O. / MANAGEMENT OF COASTAL ZONE RESOURCES IN PANAMA. Unknown Host Publication Title. Vol. 1 ASCE, 1987. pp. 1130-1145
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