Malignant neoplasms of the external auditory canal and temporal bone

W. Jarrard Goodwin, R. H. Jesse

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

107 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In a review of 136 patients with squamous cell, basal cell, and salivary gland cancers involving the external auditory canal and temporal bone, the majority of patients had received prior treatment and came to us with recurrent tumor. Squamous cell carcinoma of the concha and catilaginous ear canal behaved aggressively. Five-year survival in 35 patients with deep temporal bone involvement was 29%. The major reason for failure in this group was incomplete resection of disease. Postoperative irradiation was of no benefit when the cancer could not be completely excised. When compared with surgery alone, combined therapy with postoperative irradiation did improve local control in patients with completely resected lesions but did not demonstrate a corresponding increase in five-year survival.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)675-679
Number of pages5
JournalArchives of Otolaryngology
Volume106
Issue number11
StatePublished - Jan 1 1980
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Ear Canal
Temporal Bone
Neoplasms
Salivary Gland Neoplasms
Survival
Squamous Cell Carcinoma
Epithelial Cells
Therapeutics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Otorhinolaryngology

Cite this

Malignant neoplasms of the external auditory canal and temporal bone. / Goodwin, W. Jarrard; Jesse, R. H.

In: Archives of Otolaryngology, Vol. 106, No. 11, 01.01.1980, p. 675-679.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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