Malaria transmission in urban sub-Saharan Africa

Vincent Robert, Kate Macintyre, Joseph Keating, Jean Francois Trape, Jean Bernard Duchemin, McWilson Warren, John C Beier

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

253 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The rapid increase in the world's urban population has major implications for the epidemiology of malaria. A review of malaria transmission in sub-Saharan African cities shows the strong likelihood of transmission occurring within these sprawling cities, whatever the size or characteristics of their bioecologic environment. A meta-analysis of results from studies of malaria transmission in sub-Saharan Africa shows a loose linear negative relationship between mean annual entomologic inoculation rates (EIR) and the level of urbanicity. Few studies have failed to find entomologic evidence of some transmission. Our results show mean annual EIRs of 7.1 in the city centers, 45.8 in periurban areas, and 167.7 in rural areas. The impact of urbanization in reducing transmission is more marked in areas where the mean rainfall is low and seasonal. Considerable variation in the level of transmission exists among cities and within different districts in the same city. This article presents evidence from past literature to build a conceptual framework to begin to explain this heterogeneity. The potential for malaria epidemics owing to decreasing levels of natural immunity may be offset by negative impacts of urbanization on the larval ecology of anopheline mosquitoes. Malaria control in urban environments may be simpler as a result of urbanization; however, much of what we know about malaria transmission in rural environments might not hold in the urban context.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)169-176
Number of pages8
JournalAmerican Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene
Volume68
Issue number2
StatePublished - Feb 1 2003
Externally publishedYes

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Africa South of the Sahara
Malaria
Urbanization
Urban Population
Ecology
Culicidae
Innate Immunity
Meta-Analysis
Epidemiology

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Parasitology
  • Infectious Diseases

Cite this

Robert, V., Macintyre, K., Keating, J., Trape, J. F., Duchemin, J. B., Warren, M., & Beier, J. C. (2003). Malaria transmission in urban sub-Saharan Africa. American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene, 68(2), 169-176.

Malaria transmission in urban sub-Saharan Africa. / Robert, Vincent; Macintyre, Kate; Keating, Joseph; Trape, Jean Francois; Duchemin, Jean Bernard; Warren, McWilson; Beier, John C.

In: American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene, Vol. 68, No. 2, 01.02.2003, p. 169-176.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Robert, V, Macintyre, K, Keating, J, Trape, JF, Duchemin, JB, Warren, M & Beier, JC 2003, 'Malaria transmission in urban sub-Saharan Africa', American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene, vol. 68, no. 2, pp. 169-176.
Robert V, Macintyre K, Keating J, Trape JF, Duchemin JB, Warren M et al. Malaria transmission in urban sub-Saharan Africa. American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene. 2003 Feb 1;68(2):169-176.
Robert, Vincent ; Macintyre, Kate ; Keating, Joseph ; Trape, Jean Francois ; Duchemin, Jean Bernard ; Warren, McWilson ; Beier, John C. / Malaria transmission in urban sub-Saharan Africa. In: American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene. 2003 ; Vol. 68, No. 2. pp. 169-176.
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