Malaise, motivation and motherhood: Predictors of engagement in behavioral interventions from a randomized controlled trial for HIV+ women in drug abuse recovery

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

11 Scopus citations

Abstract

Drug abuse has serious consequences for the wellbeing of persons with HIV/AIDS but suboptimal rates of client engagement limit the efficacy of interventions. The present study examines and compares client characteristics that predicted engagement (defined as attendance at two or more sessions) in a family intervention (SET) and a group intervention within a randomized trial aimed at preventing relapse and improving medication adherence for 126 predominantly African American HIV+ women in drug abuse recovery. Intervention engagement (60% overall) was not significantly different across the two interventions. Fewer physical and mental symptoms (malaise) (P < 0.05), living independently (P < 0.05), living with children (P < 0.05), and readiness to change (P < 0.05) were associated with engagement across the two interventions. Results from this study can be used to inform outreach and engagement approaches for women dually affected by drug abuse and HIV/AIDS.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)396-406
Number of pages11
JournalAIDS and Behavior
Volume15
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 2011

Keywords

  • Drug abuse
  • Engagement
  • HIV/AIDS
  • Women

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Infectious Diseases
  • Social Psychology

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Malaise, motivation and motherhood: Predictors of engagement in behavioral interventions from a randomized controlled trial for HIV+ women in drug abuse recovery'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this