Major depression associated with earlier alcohol relapse in treated teens with AUD

Jack R. Cornelius, Stephen A. Maisto, Christopher S. Martin, Oscar G. Bukstein, Ihsan M. Salloum, Dennis C. Daley, D. Scott Wood, Duncan B. Clark

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

84 Scopus citations

Abstract

This study evaluated whether the common comorbid diagnosis of major depressive disorder (MDD) is associated with an earlier relapse to alcohol use among adolescents with an alcohol use disorder (AUD). The study sample consisted of 116 adolescents between the ages of 14 and 18 with an AUD recruited from treatment facilities in the Pittsburgh area, 50 of whom demonstrated a current MDD. An extensive baseline interview was conducted, followed by monthly interviews of alcohol use conducted by telephone for the following year. Those with current comorbid MDD demonstrated a median survival time of only 19 days until the first drink, while those without MDD demonstrated a median survival time of 45 days, which was a significant difference (Kaplan-Meier survival analysis, Breslow Test Statistic=4.27, df=1, P=.039). These results suggest that the comorbid presence of MDD is associated with an earlier relapse to alcohol use among adolescents with an AUD.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1035-1038
Number of pages4
JournalAddictive Behaviors
Volume29
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2004
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Adolescence
  • Alcohol use disorder
  • Comorbidity
  • Major depression
  • Relapse

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Clinical Psychology

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    Cornelius, J. R., Maisto, S. A., Martin, C. S., Bukstein, O. G., Salloum, I. M., Daley, D. C., Wood, D. S., & Clark, D. B. (2004). Major depression associated with earlier alcohol relapse in treated teens with AUD. Addictive Behaviors, 29(5), 1035-1038. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.addbeh.2004.02.056