Major basic protein as a marker of malignant potential in trophoblastic neoplasia

Karen V. Gurian, Earl C. Podratz, Steven A. Elg, Leo B. Twiggs, John R. Lurain, Jill M. Wagner, Gerald J. Gleich

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Scopus citations

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: We tested whether serum pregnancy-associated major basic protein levels distinguish between benign and malignant trophoblastic disease. STUDY DESIGN: We compared serum pregnancy-associated major basic protein levels in seven patient groups: nonpregnant and pregnant controls, partial moles, complete moles, persistent moles, placental-site trophoblastic tumors, and choriocarcinoma. RESULTS: The results showed that patients with partial and complete moles had elevated serum pregnancy-associated major basic protein levels comparable to normal pregnancy. In contrast, patients with persistent mole, placental-site trophoblastic tumors and choriocarcinoma had low median serum levels comparable to those of the nonpregnant controls. Significant differences were shown between the complete and persistent mole groups (p = 0.0001) and between the complete mole group and the choriocarcinoma group (p = 0.0001); however, persistent moles were indistinguishable from choriocarcinoma (p = 0.2010). CONCLUSION: Serum pregnancy-associated major basic protein levels thus distinguish between benign disorders, such as pregnancy and partial and complete moles, and trophoblastic tumors, such as persistent moles and choriocarcinoma: The absence of elevated serum levels of pregnancy-associated major basic protein may be useful clinically to indicate a more aggressive or frankly malignant tumor.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)632-637
Number of pages6
JournalAmerican journal of obstetrics and gynecology
Volume175
Issue number3 PART I
DOIs
StatePublished - 1996

Keywords

  • Choriocarcinoma
  • Major basic protein
  • Mole
  • Trophoblastic disease

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)
  • Obstetrics and Gynecology

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    Gurian, K. V., Podratz, E. C., Elg, S. A., Twiggs, L. B., Lurain, J. R., Wagner, J. M., & Gleich, G. J. (1996). Major basic protein as a marker of malignant potential in trophoblastic neoplasia. American journal of obstetrics and gynecology, 175(3 PART I), 632-637. https://doi.org/10.1053/ob.1996.v175.a74413