Major basic protein as a marker of malignant potential in trophoblastic neoplasia

Karen V. Gurian, Earl C. Podratz, Steven A. Elg, Leo B. Twiggs, John R. Lurain, Jill M. Wagner, Gerald J. Gleich

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: We tested whether serum pregnancy-associated major basic protein levels distinguish between benign and malignant trophoblastic disease. STUDY DESIGN: We compared serum pregnancy-associated major basic protein levels in seven patient groups: nonpregnant and pregnant controls, partial moles, complete moles, persistent moles, placental-site trophoblastic tumors, and choriocarcinoma. RESULTS: The results showed that patients with partial and complete moles had elevated serum pregnancy-associated major basic protein levels comparable to normal pregnancy. In contrast, patients with persistent mole, placental-site trophoblastic tumors and choriocarcinoma had low median serum levels comparable to those of the nonpregnant controls. Significant differences were shown between the complete and persistent mole groups (p = 0.0001) and between the complete mole group and the choriocarcinoma group (p = 0.0001); however, persistent moles were indistinguishable from choriocarcinoma (p = 0.2010). CONCLUSION: Serum pregnancy-associated major basic protein levels thus distinguish between benign disorders, such as pregnancy and partial and complete moles, and trophoblastic tumors, such as persistent moles and choriocarcinoma: The absence of elevated serum levels of pregnancy-associated major basic protein may be useful clinically to indicate a more aggressive or frankly malignant tumor.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)632-637
Number of pages6
JournalAmerican Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology
Volume175
Issue number3 PART I
StatePublished - Dec 1 1996
Externally publishedYes

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Choriocarcinoma
Pregnancy
Placental Site Trophoblastic Tumor
Serum
Neoplasms
Proteins
Trophoblastic Neoplasms

Keywords

  • Choriocarcinoma
  • Major basic protein
  • Mole
  • Trophoblastic disease

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)
  • Obstetrics and Gynecology

Cite this

Gurian, K. V., Podratz, E. C., Elg, S. A., Twiggs, L. B., Lurain, J. R., Wagner, J. M., & Gleich, G. J. (1996). Major basic protein as a marker of malignant potential in trophoblastic neoplasia. American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, 175(3 PART I), 632-637.

Major basic protein as a marker of malignant potential in trophoblastic neoplasia. / Gurian, Karen V.; Podratz, Earl C.; Elg, Steven A.; Twiggs, Leo B.; Lurain, John R.; Wagner, Jill M.; Gleich, Gerald J.

In: American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Vol. 175, No. 3 PART I, 01.12.1996, p. 632-637.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Gurian, KV, Podratz, EC, Elg, SA, Twiggs, LB, Lurain, JR, Wagner, JM & Gleich, GJ 1996, 'Major basic protein as a marker of malignant potential in trophoblastic neoplasia', American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, vol. 175, no. 3 PART I, pp. 632-637.
Gurian KV, Podratz EC, Elg SA, Twiggs LB, Lurain JR, Wagner JM et al. Major basic protein as a marker of malignant potential in trophoblastic neoplasia. American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology. 1996 Dec 1;175(3 PART I):632-637.
Gurian, Karen V. ; Podratz, Earl C. ; Elg, Steven A. ; Twiggs, Leo B. ; Lurain, John R. ; Wagner, Jill M. ; Gleich, Gerald J. / Major basic protein as a marker of malignant potential in trophoblastic neoplasia. In: American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology. 1996 ; Vol. 175, No. 3 PART I. pp. 632-637.
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