Magnetic resonance imaging tendon integrity assessment after arthroscopic partial-thickness rotator cuff repair

Jaideep J. Iyengar, Sharoun Porat, Keith R. Burnett, Luis Marrero-Perez, Victor H. Hernandez, Wesley M. Nottage

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

15 Scopus citations

Abstract

Purpose: Our goal was to assess the integrity of the repaired rotator cuff in patients with partial-thickness rotator cuff tears who underwent a technique of tear completion followed by surgical repair, using post-repair magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at a minimum of 2 years' follow-up. Methods: An all-arthroscopic surgical technique was used for these marked partial-thickness tears, by use of double-loaded footprint anchors and/or lateral sutures or anchors as appropriate for tissue quality. A total of 22 patients who had completion of the tear followed by repair were reimaged with 2-sequence noncontrast MRI to determine the integrity of the rotator cuff repair at a minimum of 2 years postoperatively. Results: Of the 22 patients, 18 (82%) had no evidence of a full-thickness or near full-thickness defect on follow-up MRI. The presence of a defect on follow-up MRI (18%) did not correlate with clinical results. Younger patients showed a trend toward maintaining better integrity. Conclusions: In 18 of 22 patients (82%) with partial-thickness rotator cuff tears treated with tear completion followed by surgical repair, there was no evidence of a full-thickness or near full-thickness defect on follow-up MRI at a minimum of 2 years. The patient's age may be an important factor in tendon healing. Level of Evidence: Level IV, therapeutic case series.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)306-313+e46
JournalArthroscopy - Journal of Arthroscopic and Related Surgery
Volume27
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2011
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine

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