Magnetic resonance imaging determination of left ventricular mass: Junior Olympic weightlifters

Steven J. Fleck, Pradip M. Pattany, Michael H. Stone, William J. Kraemer, John Thrush, Keith Wong

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33 Scopus citations

Abstract

The relationship between left ventricular mass (LVM) and peak V̇O2 in junior elite Olympic-style weightlifters and sedentary subjects was investigated. Ten male weightlifters (mean ± SE, age = 17.5 ± 0.4 yr, wt = 72.9 ± 3.3 kg) and 15 sedentary males (age = 18.8 ± 0.4 yr, wt = 69.6 ± 2.0 kg) served as subjects. Peak V̇O2 was measured using a continuous, incrementally loaded bicycle ergometry protocol. LVM was measured using magnetic resonance imaging techniques. Absolute peak V̇O2 was not significantly different (P ≥ 0.05) between the weightlifters and the control subjects (3.5 ± 0.1 vs 3.3 ± 0.1 l · min-1). Absolute LVM (g) was significantly (P ≤ 0.05) correlated to absolute peak V̇O2 (l · min-1) in the weightlifters (r = 0.723), but not in the control subjects. No other correlations between LVM in absolute or normalized by body weight, body surface area, or fat free mass terms, and absolute peak or normalized by body weight peak V̇O2 were significant. The weightlifters absolute LVM was significantly greater (P ≤ 0.05) than that of the controls (208.1 ± 10.0 vs 179.7 ± 8.4 g). LVM normalized by body weight and body surface area, but not by fat free mass, was significantly greater (P ≤ 0.05) in the weightlifters than the control subjects. These data indicate that LVM in junior elite weightlifters is greater than that of control subjects and absolute LVM is related to absolute peak V̇O2 in weightlifters but not control subjects.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)522-527
Number of pages6
JournalMedicine and science in sports and exercise
Volume25
Issue number4
StatePublished - Apr 1993

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Keywords

  • CARDIAC STRUCTURE
  • MAGNETIC RESONANCE IMAGING
  • WEIGHT TRAINING

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Physical Therapy, Sports Therapy and Rehabilitation

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