Lung health in era of climate change and dust storms

Michael D. Schweitzer, Andrew S. Calzadilla, Oriana Salamo, Arash Sharifi, Naresh Kumar, Gregory Holt, Michael A Campos, Mehdi Mirsaeidi

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Dust storms are strong winds which lead to particle exposure over extensive areas. These storms influence air quality on both a local and global scale which lead to both short and long-term effects. The frequency of dust storms has been on the rise during the last decade. Forecasts suggest that their incidence will increase as a response to the effects of climate change and anthropogenic activities. Elderly people, young children, and individuals with chronic cardiopulmonary diseases are at the greatest risk for health effects of dust storms. A wide variety of infectious and non-infectious diseases have been associated with dust exposure. Influenza A virus, pulmonary coccidioidomycosis, bacterial pneumonia, and meningococcal meningitis are a few examples of dust-related infectious diseases. Among non-infectious diseases, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, asthma, sarcoidosis and pulmonary fibrosis have been associated with dust contact. Here, we review two molecular mechanisms of dust induced lung disease for asthma and sarcoidosis. We can also then further understand the mechanisms by which dust particles disturb airway epithelial and immune cells.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)36-42
Number of pages7
JournalEnvironmental Research
Volume163
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2018

Fingerprint

Climate Change
dust storm
Dust
Climate change
Health
dust
Lung
climate change
asthma
Pulmonary diseases
meningitis
Sarcoidosis
influenza
pneumonia
Particles (particulate matter)
infectious disease
Asthma
Meningococcal Meningitis
Coccidioidomycosis
virus

Keywords

  • Asthma
  • COPD
  • Dust
  • Lung health
  • Sarcoidosis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry
  • Environmental Science(all)

Cite this

Lung health in era of climate change and dust storms. / Schweitzer, Michael D.; Calzadilla, Andrew S.; Salamo, Oriana; Sharifi, Arash; Kumar, Naresh; Holt, Gregory; Campos, Michael A; Mirsaeidi, Mehdi.

In: Environmental Research, Vol. 163, 01.05.2018, p. 36-42.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Schweitzer, Michael D. ; Calzadilla, Andrew S. ; Salamo, Oriana ; Sharifi, Arash ; Kumar, Naresh ; Holt, Gregory ; Campos, Michael A ; Mirsaeidi, Mehdi. / Lung health in era of climate change and dust storms. In: Environmental Research. 2018 ; Vol. 163. pp. 36-42.
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