Luminescent chemosensors based on semiconductor quantum dots

Francisco Raymo, Ibrahim Yildiz

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

101 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Semiconductor quantum dots are inorganic nanoparticles with unique photophysical properties. In particular, their huge one- and two-photon absorption cross sections, tunable emission bands and excellent photobleaching resistances are stimulating the development of luminescent probes for biomedical imaging and sensing applications. Indeed, electron and energy transfer processes can be designed to switch the luminescence of semiconductor quantum dots in response to molecular recognition events. On the basis of these operating principles, the presence of target analytes can be transduced into detectable luminescence signals. In fact, luminescent chemosensors based on semiconductor quantum dots are starting to be developed to detect small molecules, monitor DNA hybridization, assess protein-ligand complementarities, test enzymatic activity and probe pH distributions. Although fundamental research is still very much needed to understand further the fundamental factors regulating the behavior of these systems and refine their performance, it is becoming apparent that sensitive probes based on semiconductor quantum dots will become invaluable analytical tools for a diversity of applications in biomedical research.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)2036-2043
Number of pages8
JournalPhysical Chemistry Chemical Physics
Volume9
Issue number17
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 6 2007

Fingerprint

Semiconductor quantum dots
quantum dots
Luminescence
probes
Photons
luminescence
Photobleaching
Molecular recognition
photons
Energy transfer
absorption cross sections
monitors
electron transfer
deoxyribonucleic acid
energy transfer
Switches
electron energy
Nanoparticles
Ligands
proteins

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physical and Theoretical Chemistry
  • Atomic and Molecular Physics, and Optics

Cite this

Luminescent chemosensors based on semiconductor quantum dots. / Raymo, Francisco; Yildiz, Ibrahim.

In: Physical Chemistry Chemical Physics, Vol. 9, No. 17, 06.07.2007, p. 2036-2043.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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