Long-term recording of electromyographic activity from multiple muscles to monitor physical activity of participants with or without a neurological disorder

Katie Gant, Jorge Bohorquez, Christine K. Thomas

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

Various portable monitors have been used to quantify physical activity but most rely on detecting limb movement with a sensor rather than measuring muscle activity. Our first goal was to design and validate a portable system for recording surface electromyographic activity (EMG) from eight muscles over 24 h. The modular system includes: (1) preamplifiers that filter and amplify signals; (2) a preprocessor unit for further filtering and amplification, signal offset and power supply modification; (3) a data-logger for analog-to-digital conversion; a flash memory card for data storage and (4) a rechargeable battery. The equipment samples EMG at 1000 Hz, has a resolution of 2.6 μV and records signals up to 10 mV. The built-in analog filters create a bandwidth appropriate for surface EMG. Our second aim was to test the system biologically by recording EMG from able-bodied and spinal cord injured participants. Modifications were made to electrodes for remote preamplifier placement, and to the battery connection after pilot testing. Thereafter, 31 consecutive 24-h EMG recordings were successful. Both the engineering and biological validation of this system establishes it as a valuable tool for measuring physical activity from different muscles in real-world environments whether individuals have an intact or damaged nervous system.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)81-91
Number of pages11
JournalBiomedizinische Technik
Volume64
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2019

Keywords

  • physical activity
  • portable recordings
  • spinal cord injury

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biomedical Engineering

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