Long-term cost effectiveness of addiction treatment for criminal offenders

Kathryn McCollister, Michael French, Michael L. Prendergast, Elizabeth Hall, Stan Sacks

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

38 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This paper extends previous research that performed a cost-effectiveness analysis (CEA) of the Amity in-prison therapeutic community (TC) and Vista aftercare programs for criminal offenders in southern California. To assess the impact of treatment over time for this unique sample of criminal offenders, a 5-year follow-up CEA was performed to compare the cost of an offender's treatment - starting with the in-prison TC program and including any community-based treatment received post-parole - and the effectiveness of treatment in terms of days reincarcerated. The average cost of addiction treatment over the baseline and 5-year follow-up period was $7,041 for the Amity group and $1,731 for the control group. The additional investment of $5,311 in treatment yielded 81 fewer incarceration days (13%) among Amity participants relative to controls - a cost-effectiveness ratio of $65. When considering the average daily cost of incarceration in California ($72), these results suggest that offering treatment in prison and then directing offenders into community-based aftercare treatment is a cost-effective policy tool.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)659-679
Number of pages21
JournalJustice Quarterly
Volume21
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2004

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addiction
Cost-Benefit Analysis
offender
Prisons
costs
Therapeutic Community
Aftercare
correctional institution
therapeutic community
after-care
Health Care Costs
Therapeutics
Costs and Cost Analysis
community
Group
Control Groups
Research

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Law
  • Pathology and Forensic Medicine

Cite this

Long-term cost effectiveness of addiction treatment for criminal offenders. / McCollister, Kathryn; French, Michael; Prendergast, Michael L.; Hall, Elizabeth; Sacks, Stan.

In: Justice Quarterly, Vol. 21, No. 3, 01.12.2004, p. 659-679.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

McCollister, Kathryn ; French, Michael ; Prendergast, Michael L. ; Hall, Elizabeth ; Sacks, Stan. / Long-term cost effectiveness of addiction treatment for criminal offenders. In: Justice Quarterly. 2004 ; Vol. 21, No. 3. pp. 659-679.
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