Long-term corticosteroid treatment but not chronic stress affects 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type I activity in rat brain and peripheral tissues

Peter H. Jellinck, Firdaus Dhabhar, Randall R. Sakai, Bruce S. McEwen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

17 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Long-term treatment (21 days) of male rats with corticosterone in the drinking water caused a significant increase in the activity of the NADP-dependent form of 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (11-HSD1) in the pituitary, thymus, and spleen, (marginally in the hippocampus, amygdala and lymph nodes), without having any effect in a number of other central and peripheral tissues. In contrast, repeated restraint stress, although increasing plasma corticosterone to the same level as that observed after its administration, failed to change the activity of this key regulatory enzyme, which allows aldosterone to exert its specific effects in the presence of a large excess of corticosterone. This resistance to elevation in 11-HSD activity was also observed in the thymuses of subordinate rats during social stratification in a visible burrow system. In both cases, the circulating levels of corticosterone were much higher in stressed rats than in control animals. Factors which might account for these differences in response are discussed and compared with the situation in intact cells where, unlike in tissue homogenates, the reduction of 11-dehydrocorticosterone to corticosterone (reductase activity) appears to predominate.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)319-323
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Steroid Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
Volume60
Issue number5-6
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 1997
Externally publishedYes

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11-beta-Hydroxysteroid Dehydrogenases
Corticosterone
Rats
Brain
Adrenal Cortex Hormones
Tissue
Thymus
Thymus Gland
Amygdala
Aldosterone
NADP
Drinking Water
Hippocampus
Oxidoreductases
Animals
Spleen
Lymph Nodes
Plasmas
Enzymes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry
  • Endocrinology

Cite this

Long-term corticosteroid treatment but not chronic stress affects 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type I activity in rat brain and peripheral tissues. / Jellinck, Peter H.; Dhabhar, Firdaus; Sakai, Randall R.; McEwen, Bruce S.

In: Journal of Steroid Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Vol. 60, No. 5-6, 01.03.1997, p. 319-323.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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