Liver disease in children with cystic fibrosis: US-biochemical comparison in 195 patients

Heidi Patrǐquín, Catherìne Ĺenaerts, Lesley J Smith, Gilles Perreault, Andrée Grignon, Denis Filiatrault, Jacques Boîsvert, Claude C. Roy, Andrée Rasquín-Weber

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

41 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

PURPOSE: To determine if abnormal liver architecture at ultrasonography (US) is related to abnormal function in children with cystic fibrosis (CF). MATERIALS AND METHODS: For 1 year, all 195 children (112 boys, 83 girls; mean age, 8.5 years) attending a CF clinic underwent abdominal US and a standard set of liver function tests. Aspartate aminotransferase, alanine aminotransferase, and γ-glutamyltranferase levels were analyzed. US signs were interpreted as follows: hypoechogenicity with prominent portal tracks as edema, hyperechogenicity as steatosis, and increased attenuation and nodules within or at the edge of the liver as cirrhosis. Signs of portal hypertension also were sought. US signs were compared with liver function test results. RESULTS: Liver sonograms were abnormal in 38 children (19%); of these, 24 (63%) had abnormal test results. The 157 children with normal liver architecture had a much lower prevalence of biochemical abnormality (33 patients [21%]; P ≤ .001). All eight children with signs of portal hypertension had abnormal test results. Fourteen (82%) of 17 children with signs of cirrhosis had abnormal liver function. Eight (57%) of 14 patients with signs of steatosis had abnormal function. Diffuse hypoechogenicity of the liver with prominent portal tracks in 16 patients was associated with abnormal function in only five patients. CONCLUSION: The relation between abnormal liver architecture at US and results of three liver function tests in children with CF was significant. The most specific US abnormalities related to abnormal function are signs suggestive of portal hypertension and cirrhosis.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)229-232
Number of pages4
JournalRadiology
Volume211
Issue number1
StatePublished - Jan 1 1999
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Cystic Fibrosis
Liver Diseases
Ultrasonography
Liver
Liver Function Tests
Portal Hypertension
Fibrosis
Aspartate Aminotransferases
Alanine Transaminase
Liver Cirrhosis
Edema

Keywords

  • Fibrosis, cystic
  • Hypertension, portal
  • Liver, cirrhosis
  • Liver, US
  • Ultrasound (US), in infants and children

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Radiological and Ultrasound Technology

Cite this

Patrǐquín, H., Ĺenaerts, C., Smith, L. J., Perreault, G., Grignon, A., Filiatrault, D., ... Rasquín-Weber, A. (1999). Liver disease in children with cystic fibrosis: US-biochemical comparison in 195 patients. Radiology, 211(1), 229-232.

Liver disease in children with cystic fibrosis : US-biochemical comparison in 195 patients. / Patrǐquín, Heidi; Ĺenaerts, Catherìne; Smith, Lesley J; Perreault, Gilles; Grignon, Andrée; Filiatrault, Denis; Boîsvert, Jacques; Roy, Claude C.; Rasquín-Weber, Andrée.

In: Radiology, Vol. 211, No. 1, 01.01.1999, p. 229-232.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Patrǐquín, H, Ĺenaerts, C, Smith, LJ, Perreault, G, Grignon, A, Filiatrault, D, Boîsvert, J, Roy, CC & Rasquín-Weber, A 1999, 'Liver disease in children with cystic fibrosis: US-biochemical comparison in 195 patients', Radiology, vol. 211, no. 1, pp. 229-232.
Patrǐquín H, Ĺenaerts C, Smith LJ, Perreault G, Grignon A, Filiatrault D et al. Liver disease in children with cystic fibrosis: US-biochemical comparison in 195 patients. Radiology. 1999 Jan 1;211(1):229-232.
Patrǐquín, Heidi ; Ĺenaerts, Catherìne ; Smith, Lesley J ; Perreault, Gilles ; Grignon, Andrée ; Filiatrault, Denis ; Boîsvert, Jacques ; Roy, Claude C. ; Rasquín-Weber, Andrée. / Liver disease in children with cystic fibrosis : US-biochemical comparison in 195 patients. In: Radiology. 1999 ; Vol. 211, No. 1. pp. 229-232.
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abstract = "PURPOSE: To determine if abnormal liver architecture at ultrasonography (US) is related to abnormal function in children with cystic fibrosis (CF). MATERIALS AND METHODS: For 1 year, all 195 children (112 boys, 83 girls; mean age, 8.5 years) attending a CF clinic underwent abdominal US and a standard set of liver function tests. Aspartate aminotransferase, alanine aminotransferase, and γ-glutamyltranferase levels were analyzed. US signs were interpreted as follows: hypoechogenicity with prominent portal tracks as edema, hyperechogenicity as steatosis, and increased attenuation and nodules within or at the edge of the liver as cirrhosis. Signs of portal hypertension also were sought. US signs were compared with liver function test results. RESULTS: Liver sonograms were abnormal in 38 children (19{\%}); of these, 24 (63{\%}) had abnormal test results. The 157 children with normal liver architecture had a much lower prevalence of biochemical abnormality (33 patients [21{\%}]; P ≤ .001). All eight children with signs of portal hypertension had abnormal test results. Fourteen (82{\%}) of 17 children with signs of cirrhosis had abnormal liver function. Eight (57{\%}) of 14 patients with signs of steatosis had abnormal function. Diffuse hypoechogenicity of the liver with prominent portal tracks in 16 patients was associated with abnormal function in only five patients. CONCLUSION: The relation between abnormal liver architecture at US and results of three liver function tests in children with CF was significant. The most specific US abnormalities related to abnormal function are signs suggestive of portal hypertension and cirrhosis.",
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T2 - US-biochemical comparison in 195 patients

AU - Patrǐquín, Heidi

AU - Ĺenaerts, Catherìne

AU - Smith, Lesley J

AU - Perreault, Gilles

AU - Grignon, Andrée

AU - Filiatrault, Denis

AU - Boîsvert, Jacques

AU - Roy, Claude C.

AU - Rasquín-Weber, Andrée

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N2 - PURPOSE: To determine if abnormal liver architecture at ultrasonography (US) is related to abnormal function in children with cystic fibrosis (CF). MATERIALS AND METHODS: For 1 year, all 195 children (112 boys, 83 girls; mean age, 8.5 years) attending a CF clinic underwent abdominal US and a standard set of liver function tests. Aspartate aminotransferase, alanine aminotransferase, and γ-glutamyltranferase levels were analyzed. US signs were interpreted as follows: hypoechogenicity with prominent portal tracks as edema, hyperechogenicity as steatosis, and increased attenuation and nodules within or at the edge of the liver as cirrhosis. Signs of portal hypertension also were sought. US signs were compared with liver function test results. RESULTS: Liver sonograms were abnormal in 38 children (19%); of these, 24 (63%) had abnormal test results. The 157 children with normal liver architecture had a much lower prevalence of biochemical abnormality (33 patients [21%]; P ≤ .001). All eight children with signs of portal hypertension had abnormal test results. Fourteen (82%) of 17 children with signs of cirrhosis had abnormal liver function. Eight (57%) of 14 patients with signs of steatosis had abnormal function. Diffuse hypoechogenicity of the liver with prominent portal tracks in 16 patients was associated with abnormal function in only five patients. CONCLUSION: The relation between abnormal liver architecture at US and results of three liver function tests in children with CF was significant. The most specific US abnormalities related to abnormal function are signs suggestive of portal hypertension and cirrhosis.

AB - PURPOSE: To determine if abnormal liver architecture at ultrasonography (US) is related to abnormal function in children with cystic fibrosis (CF). MATERIALS AND METHODS: For 1 year, all 195 children (112 boys, 83 girls; mean age, 8.5 years) attending a CF clinic underwent abdominal US and a standard set of liver function tests. Aspartate aminotransferase, alanine aminotransferase, and γ-glutamyltranferase levels were analyzed. US signs were interpreted as follows: hypoechogenicity with prominent portal tracks as edema, hyperechogenicity as steatosis, and increased attenuation and nodules within or at the edge of the liver as cirrhosis. Signs of portal hypertension also were sought. US signs were compared with liver function test results. RESULTS: Liver sonograms were abnormal in 38 children (19%); of these, 24 (63%) had abnormal test results. The 157 children with normal liver architecture had a much lower prevalence of biochemical abnormality (33 patients [21%]; P ≤ .001). All eight children with signs of portal hypertension had abnormal test results. Fourteen (82%) of 17 children with signs of cirrhosis had abnormal liver function. Eight (57%) of 14 patients with signs of steatosis had abnormal function. Diffuse hypoechogenicity of the liver with prominent portal tracks in 16 patients was associated with abnormal function in only five patients. CONCLUSION: The relation between abnormal liver architecture at US and results of three liver function tests in children with CF was significant. The most specific US abnormalities related to abnormal function are signs suggestive of portal hypertension and cirrhosis.

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KW - Hypertension, portal

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