Liver-Directed but Not Muscle-Directed AAV-Antibody Gene Transfer Limits Humoral Immune Responses in Rhesus Monkeys

Sebastian P. Fuchs, José M. Martinez-Navio, Eva G. Rakasz, Guangping Gao, Ronald C. Desrosiers

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

A number of publications have described the use of adeno-associated virus (AAV) for the delivery of anti-HIV and anti-simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) to rhesus monkeys. Anti-drug antibodies (ADAs) have been frequently observed, and long-term AAV-mediated delivery has been inconsistent. Here, we investigated different AAV vector strategies and delivery schemes to rhesus monkeys using the rhesus monkey mAb 4L6. We compared 4L6 immunoglobulin G1 (IgG1) delivery using the AAV1 versus the AAV8 serotype with a cytomegalovirus (CMV) promoter and the use of a muscle-specific versus a liver-specific promoter. Long-term expression levels of 4L6 IgG1 following AAV8-mediated gene transfer were comparable to those following AAV1-mediated gene transfer. AAV1-mediated gene transfer, using a muscle-specific promoter, showed robust ADAs and transiently low 4L6 IgG1 levels that ultimately declined to below detectable levels. Intravenous AAV8-mediated gene transfer, using a liver-specific promoter, also resulted in low levels of delivered 4L6 IgG1, but those low levels were maintained in the absence of any detectable ADAs. Booster injections using AAV1-CMV allowed for increased 4L6 IgG1 serum levels in animals that were primed with AAV8 but not with AAV1. Our results suggest that liver-directed expression may help to limit ADAs and that re-administration of AAV of a different serotype can result in successful long-term delivery of an immunogenic antibody.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)94-102
Number of pages9
JournalMolecular Therapy - Methods and Clinical Development
Volume16
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 13 2020

Fingerprint

Dependovirus
Humoral Immunity
Macaca mulatta
Immunoglobulins
Anti-Idiotypic Antibodies
Muscles
Antibodies
Liver
Genes
Cytomegalovirus
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Simian Immunodeficiency Virus
Publications
Monoclonal Antibodies
HIV
Injections
Serum

Keywords

  • AAV vector
  • AAV-antibody delivery
  • AAV1
  • AAV8
  • anti-drug antibody responses
  • CMV promoter
  • Desmin promoter
  • monoclonal antibody
  • prime-boost immunization
  • TBG promoter

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Molecular Medicine
  • Molecular Biology
  • Genetics

Cite this

Liver-Directed but Not Muscle-Directed AAV-Antibody Gene Transfer Limits Humoral Immune Responses in Rhesus Monkeys. / Fuchs, Sebastian P.; Martinez-Navio, José M.; Rakasz, Eva G.; Gao, Guangping; Desrosiers, Ronald C.

In: Molecular Therapy - Methods and Clinical Development, Vol. 16, 13.03.2020, p. 94-102.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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