Liver and kidney recipient selection of hepatitis C virus viremic donors: Meeting consensus report from the 2019 controversies in transplantation

James R. Burton, Norah A. Terrault, David S. Goldberg, Roy D. Bloom, Richard Gilroy, Julie K. Heimbach, Robert S. Brown, Gregory T. Everson, Erin Rubin, Russ Wiesner, Elizabeth A. Pomfret

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

7 Scopus citations

Abstract

The development of multiple highly effective and safe direct-acting antivirals to treat hepatitis C virus (HCV) has resulted in greater ease and confidence in managing HCV infection in transplant recipients that in turn has impacted the solid organ transplant community as well. In the United States, the opioid epidemic has increased the number of overdose deaths with a concomitant increase in younger HCV viremic donors after brain death being identified. At the same time, a decrease in HCV viremic transplant candidates has led to a growing interest in exploring the use of HCV viremic liver and kidney donor allografts in HCV-negative recipients. To date, experience with the use of HCV viremic liver and kidney allografts in HCV-negative recipients is limited to a few small prospective research trials, case series, and case reports. There are also limited data on recipient and donor selection for HCV viremic liver and kidney allografts. In response to this rapidly changing landscape in the United States, experts in the field of viral hepatitis and liver and kidney transplantation convened a meeting to review current data on liver and kidney recipient selection and developed consensus opinions related specifically to recipient and donor selection of HCV viremic liver and kidney allografts.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)476-481
Number of pages6
JournalTransplantation
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2020
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Transplantation

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