Liraglutide hospital discharge trial: A randomized controlled trial comparing the safety and efficacy of liraglutide versus insulin glargine for the management of patients with type 2 diabetes after hospital discharge

Francisco J. Pasquel, Maria A. Urrutia, Saumeth Cardona, Karla W.Z. Coronado, Bonnie Albury, Mireya C. Perez-Guzman, Rodolfo J. Galindo, Ajay Chaudhuri, Gianluca Iacobellis, Juan Palacios, Javier M. Farias, Patricia Gomez, Isabel Anzola, Priyathama Vellanki, Maya Fayfman, Georgia M. Davis, Alexandra L. Migdal, Limin Peng, Guillermo E. Umpierrez

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Aim: To compare a glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonist with basal insulin at hospital discharge in patients with uncontrolled type 2 diabetes in a randomized clinical trial. Methods: A total of 273 patients with glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c) 7%–10% (53–86 mol/mol) were randomized to liraglutide (n = 136) or insulin glargine (n = 137) at hospital discharge. The primary endpoint was difference in HbA1c at 12 and 26 weeks. Secondary endpoints included hypoglycaemia, changes in body weight, and achievement of HbA1c <7% (53 mmol/mol) without hypoglycaemia or weight gain. Results: The between-group difference in HbA1c at 12 weeks and 26 weeks was −0.28% (95% CI −0.64, 0.09), and at 26 weeks it was −0.55%, (95% CI −1.01, −0.09) in favour of liraglutide. Liraglutide treatment resulted in a lower frequency of hypoglycaemia <3.9 mmol/L (13% vs 23%; P = 0.04), but there was no difference in the rate of clinically significant hypoglycaemia <3.0 mmol/L. Compared to insulin glargine, liraglutide treatment was associated with greater weight loss at 26 weeks (−4.7 ± 7.7 kg vs −0.6 ± 11.5 kg; P < 0.001), and the proportion of patients with HbA1c <7% (53 mmol/mol) without hypoglycaemia was 48% versus 33% (P = 0.05) at 12 weeks and 45% versus 33% (P = 0.14) at 26 weeks in liraglutide versus insulin glargine. The proportion of patients with HbA1c <7% (53 mmol/mol) without hypoglycaemia and no weight gain was higher with liraglutide at 12 (41% vs 24%, P = 0.005) and 26 weeks (39% vs 22%; P = 0.014). The incidence of gastrointestinal adverse events was higher with liraglutide than with insulin glargine (P < 0.001). Conclusion: Compared to insulin glargine, treatment with liraglutide at hospital discharge resulted in better glycaemic control and greater weight loss, but increased gastrointestinal adverse events.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1351-1360
Number of pages10
JournalDiabetes, Obesity and Metabolism
Volume23
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2021
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • GLP-1RA
  • algorithm
  • glargine
  • hospital discharge
  • hospital hyperglycaemia
  • inpatient hyperglycaemia
  • type 2 diabetes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Internal Medicine
  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism
  • Endocrinology

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