Lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A2 is associated with atherosclerotic stroke risk: The Northern Manhattan Study

Mira Katan, Yeseon P. Moon, Myunghee C. Paik, Robert L. Wolfert, Ralph L Sacco, Mitchell S V Elkind

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

25 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A2 (LpPLA2) levels are associated with stroke, though whether this extends to all populations and stroke subtypes is unknown. Methods: Serum samples from stroke-free community participants in the Northern Manhattan Study were assayed for LpPLA2 mass and activity. Participants were followed annually for stroke. Cox-proportional- hazard models were fitted to estimate hazard-ratios and 95% confidence intervals (HR, 95% CI) for the association of LpPLA2 levels with ischemic stroke (IS), after adjusting for demographic and medical risk factors. Results: Serum samples were available in 1946 participants, of whom 151 (7.8%) experienced a first IS during median follow-up 11 years. Mean age was 69 (SD 10), 35.6% were men, 20% non-Hispanic Whites, 22% non-Hispanic Blacks, and 55% Hispanics. LpPLA2 mass and activity levels were not associated with overall IS risk. LpPLA2 mass but not activity levels were associated with strokes due to large artery atherosclerosis (LAA; adjusted HR per SD 1.55, 95% CI 1.17-2.04). There was a dose-response relationship with LAA (compared to first quartile, 2nd quartile HR = 1.43, 95% CI 0.23-8.64; 3rd quartile HR = 4.47, 95% CI 0.93-21.54; 4th quartile HR = 5.07, 95% CI 1.07-24.06). The associations between LpPLA2-mass and LAA-stroke risk differed by race-ethnicity (p = 0.01); LpPLA2-mass was associated with increased risk of LAA among non-Hispanic Whites (adjusted HR per SD 1.44, 95% CI 0.98-2.11), but not other race-ethnic groups. Conclusion: LpPLA2-mass levels were associated with risk of atherosclerotic stroke among non-Hispanic White participants, but not in other race-ethnic groups in the cohort. Further study is needed to confirm these race-ethnic differences and the reasons for them.

Original languageEnglish
Article numbere83393
JournalPLoS One
Volume9
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 9 2014

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1-Alkyl-2-acetylglycerophosphocholine Esterase
phospholipase A2
stroke
lipoproteins
Stroke
nationalities and ethnic groups
Hazards
Ethnic Groups
ethnic differences
atherosclerosis
Serum
Hispanic Americans
Proportional Hazards Models
arteries
dose response
confidence interval
Atherosclerosis
risk factors
demographic statistics
Arteries

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)
  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A2 is associated with atherosclerotic stroke risk : The Northern Manhattan Study. / Katan, Mira; Moon, Yeseon P.; Paik, Myunghee C.; Wolfert, Robert L.; Sacco, Ralph L; Elkind, Mitchell S V.

In: PLoS One, Vol. 9, No. 1, e83393, 09.01.2014.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Katan, Mira ; Moon, Yeseon P. ; Paik, Myunghee C. ; Wolfert, Robert L. ; Sacco, Ralph L ; Elkind, Mitchell S V. / Lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A2 is associated with atherosclerotic stroke risk : The Northern Manhattan Study. In: PLoS One. 2014 ; Vol. 9, No. 1.
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title = "Lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A2 is associated with atherosclerotic stroke risk: The Northern Manhattan Study",
abstract = "Background: Lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A2 (LpPLA2) levels are associated with stroke, though whether this extends to all populations and stroke subtypes is unknown. Methods: Serum samples from stroke-free community participants in the Northern Manhattan Study were assayed for LpPLA2 mass and activity. Participants were followed annually for stroke. Cox-proportional- hazard models were fitted to estimate hazard-ratios and 95{\%} confidence intervals (HR, 95{\%} CI) for the association of LpPLA2 levels with ischemic stroke (IS), after adjusting for demographic and medical risk factors. Results: Serum samples were available in 1946 participants, of whom 151 (7.8{\%}) experienced a first IS during median follow-up 11 years. Mean age was 69 (SD 10), 35.6{\%} were men, 20{\%} non-Hispanic Whites, 22{\%} non-Hispanic Blacks, and 55{\%} Hispanics. LpPLA2 mass and activity levels were not associated with overall IS risk. LpPLA2 mass but not activity levels were associated with strokes due to large artery atherosclerosis (LAA; adjusted HR per SD 1.55, 95{\%} CI 1.17-2.04). There was a dose-response relationship with LAA (compared to first quartile, 2nd quartile HR = 1.43, 95{\%} CI 0.23-8.64; 3rd quartile HR = 4.47, 95{\%} CI 0.93-21.54; 4th quartile HR = 5.07, 95{\%} CI 1.07-24.06). The associations between LpPLA2-mass and LAA-stroke risk differed by race-ethnicity (p = 0.01); LpPLA2-mass was associated with increased risk of LAA among non-Hispanic Whites (adjusted HR per SD 1.44, 95{\%} CI 0.98-2.11), but not other race-ethnic groups. Conclusion: LpPLA2-mass levels were associated with risk of atherosclerotic stroke among non-Hispanic White participants, but not in other race-ethnic groups in the cohort. Further study is needed to confirm these race-ethnic differences and the reasons for them.",
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T1 - Lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A2 is associated with atherosclerotic stroke risk

T2 - The Northern Manhattan Study

AU - Katan, Mira

AU - Moon, Yeseon P.

AU - Paik, Myunghee C.

AU - Wolfert, Robert L.

AU - Sacco, Ralph L

AU - Elkind, Mitchell S V

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N2 - Background: Lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A2 (LpPLA2) levels are associated with stroke, though whether this extends to all populations and stroke subtypes is unknown. Methods: Serum samples from stroke-free community participants in the Northern Manhattan Study were assayed for LpPLA2 mass and activity. Participants were followed annually for stroke. Cox-proportional- hazard models were fitted to estimate hazard-ratios and 95% confidence intervals (HR, 95% CI) for the association of LpPLA2 levels with ischemic stroke (IS), after adjusting for demographic and medical risk factors. Results: Serum samples were available in 1946 participants, of whom 151 (7.8%) experienced a first IS during median follow-up 11 years. Mean age was 69 (SD 10), 35.6% were men, 20% non-Hispanic Whites, 22% non-Hispanic Blacks, and 55% Hispanics. LpPLA2 mass and activity levels were not associated with overall IS risk. LpPLA2 mass but not activity levels were associated with strokes due to large artery atherosclerosis (LAA; adjusted HR per SD 1.55, 95% CI 1.17-2.04). There was a dose-response relationship with LAA (compared to first quartile, 2nd quartile HR = 1.43, 95% CI 0.23-8.64; 3rd quartile HR = 4.47, 95% CI 0.93-21.54; 4th quartile HR = 5.07, 95% CI 1.07-24.06). The associations between LpPLA2-mass and LAA-stroke risk differed by race-ethnicity (p = 0.01); LpPLA2-mass was associated with increased risk of LAA among non-Hispanic Whites (adjusted HR per SD 1.44, 95% CI 0.98-2.11), but not other race-ethnic groups. Conclusion: LpPLA2-mass levels were associated with risk of atherosclerotic stroke among non-Hispanic White participants, but not in other race-ethnic groups in the cohort. Further study is needed to confirm these race-ethnic differences and the reasons for them.

AB - Background: Lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A2 (LpPLA2) levels are associated with stroke, though whether this extends to all populations and stroke subtypes is unknown. Methods: Serum samples from stroke-free community participants in the Northern Manhattan Study were assayed for LpPLA2 mass and activity. Participants were followed annually for stroke. Cox-proportional- hazard models were fitted to estimate hazard-ratios and 95% confidence intervals (HR, 95% CI) for the association of LpPLA2 levels with ischemic stroke (IS), after adjusting for demographic and medical risk factors. Results: Serum samples were available in 1946 participants, of whom 151 (7.8%) experienced a first IS during median follow-up 11 years. Mean age was 69 (SD 10), 35.6% were men, 20% non-Hispanic Whites, 22% non-Hispanic Blacks, and 55% Hispanics. LpPLA2 mass and activity levels were not associated with overall IS risk. LpPLA2 mass but not activity levels were associated with strokes due to large artery atherosclerosis (LAA; adjusted HR per SD 1.55, 95% CI 1.17-2.04). There was a dose-response relationship with LAA (compared to first quartile, 2nd quartile HR = 1.43, 95% CI 0.23-8.64; 3rd quartile HR = 4.47, 95% CI 0.93-21.54; 4th quartile HR = 5.07, 95% CI 1.07-24.06). The associations between LpPLA2-mass and LAA-stroke risk differed by race-ethnicity (p = 0.01); LpPLA2-mass was associated with increased risk of LAA among non-Hispanic Whites (adjusted HR per SD 1.44, 95% CI 0.98-2.11), but not other race-ethnic groups. Conclusion: LpPLA2-mass levels were associated with risk of atherosclerotic stroke among non-Hispanic White participants, but not in other race-ethnic groups in the cohort. Further study is needed to confirm these race-ethnic differences and the reasons for them.

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