Lipid-lowering therapy in patients with peripheral arterial disease: Are guidelines being met?

Daniel G. Federman, Dana C. Ranani, Robert Kirsner, Dawn M. Bravata

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

OBJECTIVES: To determine the proportion of patients with lower extremity peripheral arterial disease (PAD) who reach recommended low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) levels (<100 mg/dl) and to identify the patient characteristics that are independently associated with attaining the LDL-C goal (<100 mg/dL). PATIENTS AND METHODS: Eligible patients were identified from a roster of patients who had undergone testing at a nonvascular laboratory between September 1, 2001, and January 31, 2002, and were found to have evidence of PAD, defined as an ankle-brachial index of 0.9 or less. We thoroughly reviewed patients' electronic medical records. Backward elimination multivariate logistic regression modeling was used to identify factors associated with reaching the goal LDL-C level. RESULTS: Among 143 patients with PAD, 105 (73%) met the goal LDL-C level. Lipid-lowering therapy was prescribed for 109 (76%). Lower diastolic blood pressure and lower weight were independently associated with an LDL-C level of less than 100 mg/dL. CONCLUSION: We found higher rates of lipid-lowering therapy in patients with PAD than reported previously. Patients with diabetes mellitus or coronary artery disease were not more likely to meet the goal LDL-C level than those without these comorbidities. Clinical practice may be catching up to clinical guidelines.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)494-498
Number of pages5
JournalMayo Clinic Proceedings
Volume80
Issue number4
StatePublished - Jan 1 2005
Externally publishedYes

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Peripheral Arterial Disease
Guidelines
LDL Cholesterol
Lipids
Therapeutics
Blood Pressure
Ankle Brachial Index
Electronic Health Records
Comorbidity
Coronary Artery Disease
Lower Extremity
Diabetes Mellitus
Logistic Models
Weights and Measures

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Lipid-lowering therapy in patients with peripheral arterial disease : Are guidelines being met? / Federman, Daniel G.; Ranani, Dana C.; Kirsner, Robert; Bravata, Dawn M.

In: Mayo Clinic Proceedings, Vol. 80, No. 4, 01.01.2005, p. 494-498.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Federman, Daniel G. ; Ranani, Dana C. ; Kirsner, Robert ; Bravata, Dawn M. / Lipid-lowering therapy in patients with peripheral arterial disease : Are guidelines being met?. In: Mayo Clinic Proceedings. 2005 ; Vol. 80, No. 4. pp. 494-498.
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